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New CLARIOstar® High Performance Microplate Reader

Published: Thursday, July 11, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, July 11, 2013
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Available in any assay, any wavelength, any bandwidth.

Over the years, many different assays have been designed to work on many different microplate readers. As new techniques emerged, so did new microplate reader technology.

The new CLARIOstar microplate reader from BMG LABTECH is the latest evolution in microplate reader instrumentation.

The CLARIOstar is German engineered and features exciting new technology, which eliminates the problem of having to compromise sensitivity for flexibility.

BMG LABTECH’s new Advanced LVF Monochromator Technology not only allows any fluorescence or luminescence wavelength to be used, it also allows wide band widths up to 100 nm, which is unprecedented for conventional monochromators.

In addition, sensitive filter technology, an ultra-fast UV/Vis absorbance spectrometer, and a solid-state Laser ensure optimal performance in all other detection modes, including fluorescence (or Förster) resonance energy transfer (FRET), time-resolved fluorescence (TRF), TR-FRET, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), and AlphaScreen® /AphaLISA®.

Advanced LVF Monochromator™ & Filter Selector System
The CLARIOstar is a modular microplate reader that is perfect for measuring and developing fluorescence and luminescence assays.

The Advanced LVF Monochromators, having continually adjustable wavelengths (320 to 850 nm) and bandwidths (8 to 100 nm) for excitation and for emission, have significantly increased performance over conventional monochromators.

In addition, highly sensitive filters can be used in the same measurement with the Advanced LVF Monochromators for maximum versatility and sensitivity.

Besides continually adjustable bandwidths up to 100 nm, BMG LABTECH’s Advanced LVF Monochromators allow for highly sensitive emission scanning in both fluorescence and luminescence assays.

Using the broadest bandwidth of 100 nm, significantly lower concentrations can be achieved than with conventional monochromators, thereby saving precious enzyme and reagents.

And these are just a few of the features that highlight this next evolution in monochromator technology, not to mention greater light transmission and better blocking of stray light.

CLARIOstar® Additional Features
In addition to its Advanced LVF Monochromators for fluorescence and luminescence assays, the CLARIOstar has technology that enhances other life science assays.

Rapid, full spectrum UV/Vis absorbance (220 to 1000 nm) is performed with BMG LABTECH’s proprietary ultra-fast spectrometer (<1 sec/well).

AlphaScreen® and AlphaLISA® measurements are improved with a dedicated, solid-state Laser. Kinetic assays can be initiated with precise reagent injectors.

Cell-based assays are greatly improved with a 0.1 mm Z-height resolution and cell layer scanning. While an integrated fluorophore library simplifies assay development and assay set up.


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