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Horiba Scientific to Host Two Day Ramanfest Conference

Published: Wednesday, January 15, 2014
Last Updated: Wednesday, January 15, 2014
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Conference will illustrate the current state of advanced applied Raman spectroscopy through presentations and discussions from today's leaders in this field from both academia and industry.

HORIBA Scientific is proud to announce that they are sponsoring this year’s RamanFest. This annual two-day conference is being held in conjunction with Harvard University, in the Pfizer auditorium. 

Our keynote lectures will be presented by internationally renowned scientists.  There will also be accompanying poster sessions, throughout the day, to encourage discussion on the latest capabilities of Raman spectroscopy. 

Professor Sunney Xie and Dr. Dan Fu, both of Harvard University, and Dr. Andrew Whitley, of HORIBA Scientific, will co-chair the event.   Other Raman leaders contributing to this event include many highly regarded luminaries in the field, including: 

  • Professor Sanford A. Asher - University of Pittsburgh 
  • Professor Paul Champion - Northeastern University Professor Ji-Xin Cheng - Purdue University 
  • Professor Igor Chourpa - University of Tours, France 
  • Professor Michael W. George - University of Nottingham, UK 
  • Dr. Neil Everall - Intertek Wilton, UK 
  • Professor Igor K. Lednev - State University of New York at Albany 
  • Professor Wei Min - Columbia University 
  • Professor Lukas Novotny - ETH Zürich, Switzerland 
  • Professor Christian Pellerin - University of Montreal, Canada 
  • Dr. Michael J. Pelletier - Pfizer Global Research & Development 
  • Professor Ping-Heng Tan - Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. R. China 
  • Professor Lawrence D. Ziegler - Boston University 

“We are very excited to be hosting 2014’s RamanFest with Harvard University,” said Steve Slutter, President of HORIBA Scientific.  “RamanFest will address and discuss cutting edge Raman techniques and capabilities, including life science applications, imaging and TERS.” 

The broad range of topics will include discussions, not only on general topics such as past, present and future Raman Spectroscopy developments and applications, but also topics on the forefront of Raman, such as: 

  • Ultra-low-frequency Raman Modes in Two-dimensional Layered Materials 
  • Pharmaceutical Polymorph Discrimination using Low-Wavenumber Raman Spectroscopy 
  • UV Raman Studies of Protein and Peptide Structure and Folding Studies 
  • Supremacy and Variety of Vibrational Spectroscopy for Probing Amyloid Fibrils: From UV Raman to VCD and TERS 
  • SERS and Fluorescence as Analytical Tools to Study Theranostic Nanosystems 
  • Coherent Low-frequency Vibrational Motion in Proteins and Biomolecules 
  • In Vitro Cellular Activity Probed by SERS: Applications for Diagnostics and Forensics 
  • Bioorthogonal Nonlinear Vibrational Imaging 
  • Raman Spectroscopy of Individual Electrospun Fibers
  • Near-field Raman Microscopy and Spectroscopy of Carbon Nanotubes 

A complete list of speakers and topics can be found on the website at: www.ramanfest.org 

There is limited seating available for RamanFest 2014. The fee is $250 for students and early registration (through February 28, 2014.)  The fee will increase to $350 for registrations starting on March 1, 2014.   For registration, and more information, including a list of hotels in the Boston area, some of which are associated with Harvard and offer special rates, please go to the RamanFest website:  www.ramanfest.org.  You may also email HORIBA Scientific or call 732-623-8142 for more information 


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