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Pyreos Demonstrates World’s Smallest Application Specific Spectrometer

Published: Tuesday, June 03, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, June 03, 2014
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Advancements in Pyreos thin film technology enables low power and small size array technology suitable for application specific spectroscopy.

Pyreos announces the release of the world’s smallest spectrometer demonstration vehicle, measuring merely 4.5cm x 2.5cm x 1cm and utilizing the companies pioneering Mid IR sensor technology offering extremely low power array sensors solutions. The spectrometer is a demonstration vehicle to enable application specific focus for consumers and customers alike. 

In a time of miniaturization many technologies cannot achieve the required size nor power consumption restrictions. Today, Pyreos has proven it can do both and ultimately driving the clear value proposition for consumer use with a cost structure that would enable every home to have the basic spectroscopy function available at arm’s length. 

Based on Pyreos thin film technology and understanding of the spectroscopy market, Pyreos has aligned itself with a number of key market segment experts to develop a family of products focussed on specific application that will change the dynamics of many industries, including but not limited to personal health, consumer, medical, environmental and industrial. 

The first of its kind in the industry, Pyroes expect later this year to release vastly smaller spectrometers with extremely low power consumption targeted at the wearable market which we believe will fundamentally change the meaning of personal health. 

Carsten Giebeler, Chief Technical Officer says; “I am extremely pleased at the recent developments here at Pyreos with the release of this demonstration vehicle. I believe we have created something brilliant, something that will change the dynamics in spectroscopy and possibly change the life of many users.”

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