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Swift Analytical Appointed UK Distributor for DeNovix DS-11 Microvolume Spectrophotometer

Published: Tuesday, July 08, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, July 08, 2014
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The patent pending DS-11’s compact, stand-alone design allows it to operate without a PC and does not require any software installation.

Swift Analytical (York, UK), is proud to announce it has been appointed as a UK distributor for the groundbreaking DeNovix DS11 microvolume spectrometer. The patent pending DS-11’s compact, stand-alone design allows it to operate without a PC and does not require any software installation. The DS-11 rapidly quantifies 0.5 – 1.0 ul samples of nucleic acids and proteins. The instrument’s Smart Path® Technology enables real time pathlength adjustment to give optimized results. The adjustable pathlength outperforms its nearest rivals by enabling accurate determination of the broadest concentration range. High concentration samples no longer require dilution and are ideal for use in the most demanding of protein production environments.

All devices have pre-installed EasyApps® for quantification of DNA, ssDNA, RNA, purified proteins, labeled proteins, and other spectrophotometric measurements. The DS-11 includes Wi-Fi, USB, and Ethernet connectivity, allowing users to easily export data via email, a USB drive, or network printers. A DS-11+ is available for both microvolume and cuvette modes. Both instruments are available in a choice of three colours.

‘With over twenty years experience in introducing new products to market, We are ideally placed to serve the needs of UK customers working with the most complex analytical problems’ commented Dr Mebs Surve, CEO of Swift Analytical.

‘Swift’s technical expertise, focus on excellent customer service and enthusiasm for ground breaking technologies make them an ideal partner to help us establish our products in the UK market.’ commented Fred Kielhorn, Managing Director of DeNovix.

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