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Gemini EM Fluorescence Microplate Reader

Product Description
The Gemini™ EM Fluorescence Microplate Reader exemplifies flexibility for fluorescence assays. Reading 6 to 384-well microplates, the optical design of the instrument can be switched from top to bottom read modes for improved sensitivity to solutions and cell-based assays. Dual monochromators for variable wavelength selection between 250 nm and 850 nm eliminate the need for searching out the right pair of excitation and emission filters and wavelength scanning across a range of wavelengths in increments as small as 1 nm can be used to optimize assay parameters. Up to 4 wavelength pairs can be read for endpoint and kinetic measurements, and the Gemini EM Microplate Reader offers well scanning to report a fluorescent measurement from a single point in the center of a microplate well to multiple points across a tissue culture well.

Unlike most fluorescence readers that may saturate out with signal intensities over 3 orders of magnitude, the patented AutoPMT Optimization System of the Gemini EM Microplate Reader adjusts the fluorescence detector to each sample well's concentration and normalizes the raw data, extending the dynamic range of assays so that low and high signals can be captured from the same plate. This calibration against an internal standard provides an additional benefit in being able to confidently compare relative fluorescence units (RFUs) of individual samples across plates and readers.

The Gemini EM Microplate Reader is supplied with SoftMax® Pro Data Acquisition & Analysis Software, Molecular Devices' industry leading all-in-one data acquisition and analysis software. Additionally, the Gemini EM Microplate Reader can be seamlessly integrated with the StakMax® Microplate Handling System through the SoftMax Pro Software.
Product Gemini EM Fluorescence Microplate Reader
Company Molecular Devices Product Directory
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Molecular Devices Product Directory
1311 Orleans Drive Sunnyvale, CA 94089-11361 United States

Tel: 1-800-635-5577
Fax: 1-408-548-6439

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