Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Stem Cells, Cellular Therapy & Biobanking
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Cell-IQ® Cell Imaging System Aids Fertility Research at Karolinska

Published: Thursday, July 09, 2009
Last Updated: Thursday, July 09, 2009
Bookmark and Share
Cell-IQ® platform helps investigate mechanisms of infertility and oocyte maturation, and for characterization of human embryonic stem cell lines.

The Karolinska Institute’s Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology is using Chip-Man Technologies’ Cell-IQ® live cell imaging and analysis platform to investigate mechanisms of infertility and oocyte maturation, as well as for development and characterization of human embryonic stem cell lines.

Professor Outi Hovatta explained: “Much of our research is concentrated on translational medicine, directly transferring our findings to clinical practice, both within the Karolinska University Hospital and further afield. My laboratory specializes in the preservation of fertility, looking at both oocyte maturation and stem cell differentiation to better understand the mechanisms involved.”

“The Cell-IQ system offers real advantages for this work, allowing accurate quantitation of results and significantly improving the quality of our data. This has allowed us to reproducibly perform experiments without extensive user intervention and without having to repeat tedious calculations. The system can recognize a wide range of cell types and processes, and has allowed us to make some exciting discoveries, identifying a lot of previously unknown aspects of cellular behavior, as well as the origin of some differentiated cell types. We have a very positive relationship with Chip-Man Technologies, working collaboratively on many of our projects. It is a good company to work with, and we certainly get the support we need.”

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Stem Cells from Nerves Forming Teeth
Findings published in the scientific journal Nature.
Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Different Cell Mechanisms Behind Regenerated Limbs
Scientists at Karolinska Institutet have discovered that two separate species of salamander differ in the way their muscles grow back in lost body parts.
Tuesday, November 26, 2013
Synthetic mRNA can Induce Self-Repair and Regeneration of the Infarcted Heart
A team of scientists has instructing injured hearts in mice to heal by expressing a factor that triggers cardiovascular regeneration driven by native heart stem cells.
Monday, September 16, 2013
The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet has decided to award the Nobel Prize jointly to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent.
Tuesday, October 09, 2012
New Findings on the Formation of Body Pigment
The skin's pigment cells can be formed from completely different cells than has hitherto been thought, a new study from the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet shows. The results, which are published in the journal Cell, also mean the discovery of a new kind of stem cell.
Thursday, October 22, 2009
Stem Cell Research Aims to Tackle Parkinson's Disease
New ways to grow brain cells in the laboratory could eventually provide a way to treat Parkinson's disease, scientists say.
Wednesday, January 23, 2008
Stem Cell Team Wins 2007 Nobel for Medicine
Stem cell researchers Mario Capecchi, Martin Evans and Oliver Smithies won the 2007 Nobel prize for medicine or physiology for their work on gene changes in mice using embryonic cells.
Tuesday, October 09, 2007
Scientific News
Snapshot Turns T Cell Immunology on its Head
New research may have implications for 1 diabetes sufferers.
Developing a Gel that Mimics Human Breast for Cancer Research
Scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Nottingham have been funded to develop a gel that will match many of the biological structures of human breast tissue, to advance cancer research and reduce animal testing.
Lung Repair and Regeneration Gene Discovered
New role for hedgehog gene offers better understanding of lung disease.
Restoring Vision with Stem Cells
Age-related macular degeneration (AMRD) could be treated by transplanting photoreceptors produced by the directed differentiation of stem cells, thanks to findings published today by Professor Gilbert Bernier of the University of Montreal and its affiliated Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital.
The Age of Humans Controlling Microbes
Engineered bacteria could soon be used to detect environmental toxins, treat diseases, and sustainably produce chemicals and fuels.
Gene Expression: A Snapshot of Stem Cell Development
New genes found that regulate development of stem cells.
Tissue-Engineered Colon from Human Cells
A study by scientists at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles has shown that tissue-engineered colon derived from human cells is able to develop the many specialized nerves required for function, mimicking the neuronal population found in native colon.
Tension Helps Heart Cells Develop Normally in the Lab
Stanford engineers have uncovered the important role tension plays in growing heart cells out of the body.
Urine Excretion From Stem Cell-Derived Kidneys
Researchers report a strategy for enabling urine excretion from kidneys grown from stem cells.
Stem Cell Research Hints at Evolution of Human Brain
Researchers at UC San Francisco have succeeded in mapping the genetic signature of a unique group of stem cells in the human brain that seem to generate most of the neurons in our massive cerebral cortex.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos