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Intelsius Celebrates 15 Years of Protecting Life’s Most Precious Cargo™

Published: Monday, January 28, 2013
Last Updated: Sunday, January 27, 2013
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Company announces launch of 15th Anniversary Celebration year.

Intelsius has announced the launch of its 15th Anniversary Celebration year.

“We are delighted to announce this milestone and intend to make it our most successful year ever,” said founder David Walsh, chief executive officer of Intelsius.

Walsh continued, “The answer to one problem created a new company that began making temperature controlled, regulatory compliant packaging 15 years ago and continues to create innovative solutions today.”

Intelsius was incorporated as DGP Group in 1998, when the company developed a unique packaging solution designed for the transportation of samples suspected of containing the BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalitis, or “Mad Cow Disease”) prion.

Within one year DGP Group commercialized the first UN-certified TSE/BSE sample shipper in the world.

The company, rebranded as Intelsius in 2010, has grown from three partners and expanded with offices and manufacturing facilities throughout the world including Europe, North America and Asia.

Intelsius now serves a wide range of organizations, including government agencies, leading pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical and clinical research industries, to major laboratories.

Intelsius temperature-controlled packaging systems (-70ºC, -20ºC, 2-8ºC and 15-25 ºC) meet or exceed WHO, ISTA, IATA perishable goods and USP1079 standards.

In addition, where applicable, they comply with UN dangerous goods regulatory performance requirements.

Intelsius, at the cutting edge of temperature control technology, maintains an ISTA-certified laboratory and has hundreds of innovative solutions to its credit.

All Intelsius products are supported by proprietary temperature and excursion risk assessment software; ATMOS.

“Intelsius will continue to push the design envelope, developing solutions and technological services unavailable elsewhere in the temperature-controlled packaging industry,” said Walsh.

Walsh continued, “Patient safety has always been at the forefront of our minds, these last 15 years. This is a great opportunity to renew our commitment to listening to our clients, being responsive to their needs, and ultimately striving to anticipate their needs before they arise.”


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