Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Stem Cells, Cellular Therapy & Biobanking
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

ViaCord® Collaborates with the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research®

Published: Wednesday, May 01, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, May 01, 2013
Bookmark and Share
PerkinElmer’s family cord blood banking business and international research organization collaborates to analyze quality and outcomes of cord blood stem cell units.

ViaCord, PerkinElmer’s family cord blood and tissue preservation business, is collaborating with the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) to collect, maintain and publish research from ViaCord’s cord blood stem cell transplants. This collaboration will expand knowledge of cord blood-derived stem cell applications throughout the medical and research community. To date, CIBMTR’s large network of transplant centers has resulted in the development of a clinical database of more than 30,000 cord blood transplant recipients for clinical decision-making, use in studies, and other research purposes with the goal of making a profound impact on the survival of cord blood transplant patients around the world. CIBMTR will work directly with ViaCord to collect and analyze data to better understand the quality and any outcome metrics of ViaCord’s released cord blood stem cell units as well as how the units are being used.

“Collaborating with CIBMTR, which has established the industry standard for collecting data around hematopoietic cellular therapy and regenerative medicine, allows us to simultaneously gain insights into the effectiveness of the cord blood stem cell units we have released for use as well as outcomes from their clinical application,” said Morey Kraus, Chief Scientific Officer, ViaCord. “We are then able to incorporate data from our transplanted units into the larger database, which may be accessed for other CIBMTR studies by the medical and scientific community to further their research and understanding of cord blood stem cells.”

ViaCord is working with CIBMTR to collect and publish data as well as identify outcomes unique to related or autologous (stem cells from the same patient) transplants. The collaboration will also enable the analysis of umbilical cord units released for potential future use in autologous cell therapy and regenerative medicine clinical trials, including Cerebral Palsy, Type 1 Diabetes and others.

“The science of cord blood and cord tissue stem cells is growing at a rapid pace,” said J. Douglas Rizzo, M.D., M.S., Associate Scientific Director, CIBMTR. “We are excited to collaborate with ViaCord to provide data and analytic expertise that will assist the development of the field through research.”

ViaCord's family cord blood banking services currently offers expectant families the opportunity to preserve their baby's umbilical cord blood for potential medical use by the child or a related family member. Families are also preserving their baby’s umbilical cord tissue because research suggests that one day these special cells may have the potential to treat medical conditions that are untreatable today. ViaCord has preserved the umbilical cord blood of more than 300,000 newborns. Twenty years ago, cord blood stem cells were used to treat just one disease, Fanconi's anemia. Today, cord blood stem cells have been used in the treatment of nearly 80 diseases, including cancers, certain blood disorders and immunodeficiencies.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

PerkinElmer Announces Collaboration with Rutgers University Cell and DNA Repository
Rutgers University Cell and DNA Repository has adopted PerkinElmer’s technologies for automation of Next Generation Sequencing sample preparation.
Thursday, February 16, 2012
Scientific News
Snapshot Turns T Cell Immunology on its Head
New research may have implications for 1 diabetes sufferers.
Developing a Gel that Mimics Human Breast for Cancer Research
Scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Nottingham have been funded to develop a gel that will match many of the biological structures of human breast tissue, to advance cancer research and reduce animal testing.
Lung Repair and Regeneration Gene Discovered
New role for hedgehog gene offers better understanding of lung disease.
Restoring Vision with Stem Cells
Age-related macular degeneration (AMRD) could be treated by transplanting photoreceptors produced by the directed differentiation of stem cells, thanks to findings published today by Professor Gilbert Bernier of the University of Montreal and its affiliated Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital.
The Age of Humans Controlling Microbes
Engineered bacteria could soon be used to detect environmental toxins, treat diseases, and sustainably produce chemicals and fuels.
Gene Expression: A Snapshot of Stem Cell Development
New genes found that regulate development of stem cells.
Tissue-Engineered Colon from Human Cells
A study by scientists at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles has shown that tissue-engineered colon derived from human cells is able to develop the many specialized nerves required for function, mimicking the neuronal population found in native colon.
Tension Helps Heart Cells Develop Normally in the Lab
Stanford engineers have uncovered the important role tension plays in growing heart cells out of the body.
Urine Excretion From Stem Cell-Derived Kidneys
Researchers report a strategy for enabling urine excretion from kidneys grown from stem cells.
Stem Cell Research Hints at Evolution of Human Brain
Researchers at UC San Francisco have succeeded in mapping the genetic signature of a unique group of stem cells in the human brain that seem to generate most of the neurons in our massive cerebral cortex.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos