Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Cost of Drug Development Reduced Thanks to New Technology

Published: Friday, January 18, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, January 18, 2013
Bookmark and Share
De Montfort University (DMU) has come together with Ithaka Life Sciences Ltd to market new technology designed to speed up and reduce the cost of the development of new drugs and medicines.

A leading expert at DMU, Professor Bob Chaudhuri, has invented the technology which will provide useful new products and services, based on a set of proteins, named cytochrome P450s (CYPs).

CYPs are found in the human liver and are mostly responsible for the metabolism of drugs in people. These proteins are commercially available for use by companies involved in the discovery of new drugs, but are inconvenient to use as they must be transported and stored at temperatures as low as minus 80 degrees Celsius.

This new technology allows for CYPs to be shipped and handled at room temperature, eliminating the need for a cold chain. This will reduce the cost and make their use in testing new drugs much quicker and easier.

Together, DMU and Ithaka have established a new company which will be called CYP Design Ltd (CDL).

Professor Chaudhuri said: “The development of new drugs can be very time-consuming and costly. It can take up to 14 years from the initial idea and cost hundreds of millions of pounds. Thousands of potential new drugs are tested initially for every one successfully brought to market.

“Early drug discovery work has to identify new chemical compounds which are potentially useful without being toxic to humans. Current testing methodologies do not address the problem as these model systems often react differently than humans to new chemicals.

“My group’s development is designed to provide the proteins that are needed for this work in a cost effective and convenient format.

DMU has licensed this new technology to CDL which is now seeking to bring the new products to market. Ithaka has worked closely with Professor Chaudhuri to set up CDL and is leading the implementation of the business strategy through Dr Bill Primrose as CEO and Dr Paul Rodgers as Chairman.

Dr Bill Primrose said: “We’re delighted to be working with DMU and believe that the technology that Professor Chaudhuri has been developing can have a significant impact on the timescales and costs involved in the early stages of drug discovery.

“CYPs are currently transported on dry ice, at around minus 80 degrees Celsius, and are stored as cold as possible in the customer’s laboratory until they are needed.

“His new technology eliminates the need for a cold chain making it easier to manufacture and ship the proteins, and making them much more convenient for the customer to use.”

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
Lung Repair and Regeneration Gene Discovered
New role for hedgehog gene offers better understanding of lung disease.
New Gene Therapy for Vision Loss From a Mitochondrial Disease
NIH-funded study shows success in targeting mitochondrial DNA in mice.
Self-Propelled Powder to Stop Bleeding
UBC researchers have created the first self-propelled particles capable of delivering coagulants against the flow of blood to treat severe bleeding, a potentially huge advancement in trauma care.
Tension Helps Heart Cells Develop Normally in the Lab
Stanford engineers have uncovered the important role tension plays in growing heart cells out of the body.
Controlling Body Temperature in Response to 'Fight or Flight'
New research in The FASEB Journal suggests that blocking TRPV1 protein causes an increased release of noradrenaline, leading to an increase in core body temperatures.
Inroads Against Leukaemia
Potential for halting disease in molecule isolated from sea sponges.
Researchers Disguise Drugs As Platelets to Target Cancer
Researchers have for the first time developed a technique that coats anticancer drugs in membranes made from a patient’s own platelets.
A Fundamental Protection Mechanism Against Formalin In Mammals is Revealed
Formaldehyde, or formalin, is well known to all of us as a common chemical used in many industrial processes and also as a preservative, remarkably we also produce formaldehyde in our bodies.
Drug Used To Treat HIV Linked to Lower Bone Mass in Newborns
NIH study finds mothers’ use of tenofovir tied to lower bone mineral content in babies.
Bone Risks Linked to Genetic Variants
A large-scale genomic study uncovered novel genetic variants and led researchers to an unexpected gene that affects bone density and fracture risk.

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos