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Supplying a Research Lab with Advanced Equipment Has Never Been Easier

Published: Monday, January 20, 2014
Last Updated: Monday, January 20, 2014
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Harvard Bioscience supplies scientific instruments to improve life science research.

Humans have always organized things. Something in our brains tells us to break information into smaller chunks, making it easier to understand. We separate animals into different species, books into genres and clothing into styles.

In this era of endless medical specialization, our aptitude for grouping is more important than ever. For each specialty area, there are thousands of pieces of equipment: it seems as though there's a new device on the market every day.

So how can doctors and medical research groups find the research apparatus and products needed to complete their projects?

Enter Harvard Bioscience, a global developer that manufactures and markets a broad range of specialized products. Their primary focus is on the scientific instruments used to advance life science and research. In 1901, the highly respected William T. Porter founded the company while teaching at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Porter became frustrated by the poor quality of equipment available to him, so he took matters into his own hands: he began manufacturing his own high-quality teaching equipment in the basement at Harvard.

This equipment gained an enviable reputation for quality and reliability. As a result, Dr. Porter's business took off and eventually became the giant it is today.

Harvard Bioscience has become one of the leading worldwide suppliers of scientific instruments specifically used to improve life science research. Their products are sought after for both well-established and cutting-edge applications, and are being used by some of the world's top pharmaceutical and biotech companies and universities. Their products are typically highly specialized for particular research applications in molecular, cellular and physiological research.

"Our brands are popular names that convey quality and consistency," said Jeffrey A. Duchemin, President and CEO of Harvard Bioscience. "It has been our goal and passion to support research with the best tools possible. Scientific technology is constantly changing, so we strive to offer the most up-to-date, state-of-the-art products for each and every customer. It is exciting to be in a field where the next breakthrough is always just around the corner."


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