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Serial Dilution in 96- & 384-well Microplates

Published: Monday, June 30, 2014
Last Updated: Monday, June 30, 2014
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INTEGRA has introduced a Row Dilution Plate Holder accessory for its VIAFLO 96 and 384 handheld benchtop pipettes.

The new row dilution plate holder adds the functionality to perform serial dilutions in rows. Serial dilutions are often carried out in row format because it allows experimenters to dilute more samples (12 instead of 8 in a 96-well plate). The plate holder can easily be adapted to work with either 96 or 384 well plates. An instructional video demonstrating the new product may be seen at

Serial dilution of assay components is a key technique in drug discovery and life science research. In assay development, serial dilution can be used to determine appropriate concentration ranges, in secondary screening to evaluate pharmacological response, and in early ADMET studies to determine toxicological effects. The ability to accurately and reproducibly produce dilution curves is essential to improving assay throughput and quality. Serial dilutions are also regularly used in microbiology when, for instance, initial concentrations of bacteria are orders of magnitude too high to perform a plate count.

The VIAFLO 96/384 offers high sample throughput without a robot. It is a handheld bench top pipette, capable of 96- and 384-well pipetting with a choice of various pipetting heads. The VIAFLO 96 benchtop electronic pipette offers an affordable solution to increase productivity when working with microplates. It closes the gap between traditional manual pipettes and robotic systems, allowing for accurate and reproducible 96-channel pipetting. The VIAFLO 384 is a more advanced system, which can work with both 96- and 384-channel pipetting heads to maximize productivity. It features the same footprint and intuitive user concept as VIAFLO 96.

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