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Asylum Announces Ben Ohler as AFM Business Manager

Published: Thursday, May 30, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, May 29, 2013
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Ohler will oversee the Company’s MFP-3D family of products.

Asylum Research has announced the appointment of Dr. Ben Ohler to the new position of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) Business Manager.

Ohler will oversee the Asylum MFP-3D family of products as well as manage the strategic direction, new product development, and product marketing for the entire line.

“We are very excited that Ben has joined the Asylum Research team,” commented Roger Proksch, President of Asylum Research.

Proksch continued, “Ben brings with him numerous years of AFM and product line management experience which will enable and accelerate our continuing growth. Ben also has an excellent applications background, so he understands the needs of researchers. He can take this knowledge and translate it to new product development that will allow us to continue our technological leadership while also expanding into new and emerging markets. I might add, he has hit the ground running and with only a few months at Asylum, Ben has successfully led the launch of our new MFP-3D Origin™ AFM.”

“I’m thrilled to be with Asylum Research,” added Ohler. “It’s fantastic to be a part of a team so utterly committed and passionate about producing the highest performance and highest quality AFMs and providing a truly unequalled standard of customer support. I’m looking forward to contributing to our continued growth.”

Before joining Asylum, Dr. Ohler held the position of Product Line Manager within the AFM group of Bruker (previously Veeco) for five years and Applications and Development Scientist for eight years.

He received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of California Santa Barbara where his research focused on the biophysics of neurodegenerative disorders.

He has numerous peer-reviewed publications and is a co-author on five patents in the field of AFM.


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