Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Cell Culture
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Spectacular Images Showing Research into Cancer, Neurodegenerative Disease and Fertility

Published: Wednesday, March 12, 2014
Last Updated: Wednesday, March 12, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Vanessa Auld from Canada, Martin Barr from Ireland and Graham Wright from Singapore announced as the winners of the GE Healthcare 2013 Cell Imaging Competition.

With over 23,000 votes cast by the public, the winners can now look forward to seeing their prize-winning images lighting up Times Square, New York at a special event between 25-27 April 2014.

For seven years, GE Healthcare’s annual competition has showcased the beauty of cells and the inspiring research of cellular biologists from around the world.   This year’s competition attracted over 100 entries from scientists who are using either high-content analysis or high- and super resolution microscopy to investigate at the cellular level a wide variety of diseases such as cancer, muscle disease and the effects of parasitic infections.

An expert scientific panel of six judges* shortlisted the finalists for each category ahead of the public vote. The full details of the three winners are:

1st place - Microscopy category

1stplace_microscopy.gif

Vanessa Auld, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Image description: Drosophila neuromuscular junction stained for extracellular matrix proteins (green and blue) and the nerve terminal (red).

Therapeutic focus: Neurodegenerative disease.

1st place – High-Content Analysis category

1stplace_HCA.gif

Martin Barr, St James’s Hospital and Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.

Image description: Lung adenocarcinoma cell stained for F-actin (green), mitochondria (red) and DNA (blue).

Therapeutic focus: Cancer.

Regional winner (Microscopy category)

Regionalwinner_microscopy.gif

Graham Wright, Institute of Medical Biology, A*STAR, Singapore

Image description: Mouse spermatocyte spread stained for KASH-5 and SCP3 (red and green) and DNA (blue).

Therapeutic focus: Fertility.

Eric Roman, General Manager of Research and Applied Markets, GE Healthcare Life Sciences, said:

“This year’s three winning images are once again incredibly beautiful and compelling, reminding us of the cellular complexity behind disease and why the study of cells is so important.  We were delighted to receive so many outstanding entries to the competition, which highlights how cell imaging is helping scientists explore the universe of the cell and is advancing our understanding of so many life-threatening and life-limiting diseases. I’d like to thank all the contestants for sending us their images, the judging panel and everyone who cast a vote.”

The winning images and gallery of all the finalists’ entries to the 2013 Cell Imaging Competition are available at www.gelifesciences.com/cellimagecompetition

*This year’s shortlist was selected by Paul Goodwin, Science Director, Cellular Imaging and Analysis at GE Healthcare; Geoffrey Grandjean, Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute, California and 2011 competition winner for the Americas; Julian P. Heath, Editor of Microscopy & Analysis; Carmen Laethem, Scientist and Project Manager, Aerie Pharmaceuticals; Kristie Nybo, Assistant Editor, BioTechniques and Nick Thomas, Principal Scientist at GE Healthcare.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Detecting Minute Nano Amounts In Environmental Samples
The NanoUmwelt project is developing a technique that can detect nanomaterials in a variety of environmental samples.
Shape Of Tumor May Affect Whether Cells Can Metastasize
Illinois researchers found that the shape of a tumor may play a role in how cancer cells become primed to spread.
‘Mini-Brains’ to Study Zika
Novel tool expected to speed research on brain and drug development.
Cytokine Triggers Immune Response at Expense of Blood Renewal
Research highlights promise of Anti-IL-1 drugs to treat chronic inflammatory disease.
Micro Heart Muscle Created from Stem Cells
Researchers have designed a new way to create micro heart muscle from stem cells using a unique dog bone dish.
“Secret Sauce” for Personalized, Functional Insulin-producing Cells
Researchers uncover molecular switch to make effective sugar-responsive, insulin-releasing cells in a dish, offering hope for diabetes therapy.
Insights into Early Human Embryo Development
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and the Ludwig Cancer Research in Stockholm have conducted a detailed molecular analysis of the embryo’s first week of development.
Boosting Gene Transfer Capabilities
A new and highly efficient method for gene transfer has been developed.
Liver-On-Chip Tracks Dynamics of Cellular Function
Hebrew University’s liver-on-chip platform is uniquely able to monitor metabolic changes indicating mitochondrial damage occurring at drug concentrations previously regarded as safe.
EU Project Aims to Cure Type 1 Diabetes
Researchers develop organoids from insulin-producing cells for transplantation.
SELECTBIO

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,500+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!