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SLAS Short Courses at ELRIG Drug Discovery 2014

Published: Saturday, June 21, 2014
Last Updated: Saturday, June 21, 2014
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SLAS short courses will focus on high content screening, cell-based assays and 3D culture models, and laboratory automation.

The Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening’s highly-experienced and qualified instructors will present three short courses at the ELRIG Drug Discovery 2014 Conference, taking place on September 1 at Manchester, UK.

In an early expansion of their relationship with ELRIG, SLAS will be hosting three short courses on the 1st of September, as part of the Drug Discovery meeting to be held in Manchester, UK (September 2-3).

Bringing this opportunity to Europe will make available to European members a number of the educational offerings that until now have only been available to attendees of the SLAS Annual Meeting.

Respectively, the three short courses will focus on High Content Screening, Cell-based Assays and 3D Culture Models, and Laboratory Automation. In the first course, Dr. Eberhard Krausz and Marc Bickle, PhD, will demonstrate the power of HCS through an overview of the components.

Throughout the second course Dr. Terry Riss and Dr. Jens M. Kelm will show how to establish cell-based assays and determine the latest technological advances in 3D culture technologies.

With the third course, Jonathan Wingfield, PhD, and Malcolm Crook, PhD, will show the possibilities to explore the various options for successfully deploying automation within a laboratory environment.

SLAS was proud to establish the Europe Council in 2013 and promptly started working on its partnerships with existing organizations to bring SLAS science to the broader research community in Europe.

An Education Advisory Committee and an Industry Advisory Committee were founded to complement the SLAS European organization.


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