Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Cell Culture
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>Videos>This Video


CellKey 384 Label-Free Cellular Analysis System
Molecular Devices

The CellKey® 384 System is a universal, high throughput label-free platform for real-time cell-based functional analysis of endogenous and recombinant receptors. The system enables the measurement of a wide range of targets in a single-assay, including all families of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs), adhesion molecules, and indirect measurement of ion channel activation. In particular, the system is a major breakthrough for accurate monitoring of Gαi- and Gαs-coupled GPCR receptors, as it overcomes many of the challenges and limitations found with the traditionally available assay formats. The underlying technology of the system is cellular dielectric spectroscopy (CDS), an impedance based measurement that eliminates the need for labels, such as tags, dyes, or specialized reagents. By eliminating the requirement for labels, the CellKey System streamlines assay development by reducing the number of steps to be optimized, and allows users to develop one standard assay solution for multiple target classes, regardless of pathway. The 384-well format increases throughput and enables up to 25,000 samples to be acquired per 8 hour day. The higher density microplate format reduces the per well assay costs by reducing the cells/well and reagents requirements. Additionally, the CellKey 384 System includes a tip wash system, which extends unattended operation. The system was designed to meet the needs of drug discovery scientists-- from target identification and validation through lead optimization. It is sensitive enough to monitor ligand-mediated activation of endogenous receptors expressed in adherent or non-adherent cell lines, including primary cells. The benefit of this is the ability to generate more physiologically relevant data than obtained when using genetically and chemically manipulated cells. While traditional technologies measure only discrete intracellular events, such as Ca2+ flux or cAMP fluctuation, the CellKey System measures the integrated response of the whole cell to receptor activation. By presenting a more complete picture of the complex pathways activated, scientists gain a better understanding of the cellular response. For example, upon detecting GPCR activation, the CellKey System generates robust and reproducible response profiles that are characteristic of Gαs-, Gαi- or Gαq- GPCRs. This qualitative data can be used to identify and deconvolute the pathway(s) through which receptors transduce their signals, and enables detailed interpretation of the mechanism of action (MOA) of lead compounds. The CellKey 384 System is a fully integrated solution consisting of the instrument with on-board temperature control and internally integrated fluidics, a custom microplate for detection, and an extensive software suite. The integrated pipettor head allows the system to add ligand while simultaneously capturing the immediate cellular response. This feature contributes to the robustness and reproducibility of the CellKey System response profiles. The system software manages both data acquisition and the information-rich, real-time kinetic data analysis. Additionally, the system has been designed to integrate with most available automation options.

Request more information
Company product page

Scientific News
Developing a Gel that Mimics Human Breast for Cancer Research
Scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Nottingham have been funded to develop a gel that will match many of the biological structures of human breast tissue, to advance cancer research and reduce animal testing.
Restoring Vision with Stem Cells
Age-related macular degeneration (AMRD) could be treated by transplanting photoreceptors produced by the directed differentiation of stem cells, thanks to findings published today by Professor Gilbert Bernier of the University of Montreal and its affiliated Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital.
Tissue-Engineered Colon from Human Cells
A study by scientists at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles has shown that tissue-engineered colon derived from human cells is able to develop the many specialized nerves required for function, mimicking the neuronal population found in native colon.
Tension Helps Heart Cells Develop Normally in the Lab
Stanford engineers have uncovered the important role tension plays in growing heart cells out of the body.
Urine Excretion From Stem Cell-Derived Kidneys
Researchers report a strategy for enabling urine excretion from kidneys grown from stem cells.
The Black Box at the Beginning of Life
Kyoto University sheds light on the earliest stages of human germ cell development.
Flu Study, on Hold, Yields New Vaccine Technology
Vaccines to protect against an avian influenza pandemic as well as seasonal flu may be mass produced more quickly and efficiently using technology described today by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
3D Spheroid Culture Trends
Three dimensional (3D) cell culture has been an area of increasing interest and relevance across a wide breadth of fields for some time.
The Mending Tissue - Cellular Instructions for Tissue Repair
NUS-led collaborative study identifies universal mechanism that explains how tissue shape regulates physiological processes such as wound healing and embryo development.
Most Complete Human Brain Model to Date is a ‘Brain Changer’
Once licensed, model likely to accelerate study of Alzheimer’s, autism, more.

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos