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Investigation of Cell-Cell Interactions via Compartmentalized Co-culture Platforms

Elliot Hui, Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering, University of California, speaking at Lab on a Chip World Congress 2013.
Date Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013
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