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  Events - September 2012


SMi - Next-Generation Sequencing

17 Sep 2012 - 18 Sep 2012 - London, England



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SMi present their inaugural...

Next-Generation Sequencing 

A data interpretation and analytical perspective

Monday 17th and Tuesday 18th September 2012, Copthorne Tara Hotel, London

Over the past seven years Next-Generation Sequencing has fundamentally altered genomics researchFalling costs have catalysed large knowledge-gaining experiments that were financially unjustifiable or impossible five years ago These include metagenomic research into patient variablility, sequencing of model and pathogenic species and ELT compound library screening techniques. 

Storage, analysis and interpretation of the data however, remain major and consistent obstacles.  Focusing on these challenges, SMi’s Next-Generation Sequencing conference features a problem-solving approach to accelerate your research, product and clinical development. 

Whether clarifying the molecular basis of disease, developing new antimicrobials or developing better protein therapeutics, join our expert faculty this September to: 

  •  Generate longer nucleic acid and oligonucleotide sequences of higher quality
  • Increase consensus accuracy and genome coverage
  • Maximise the alignment and assembly of NGS reads with reference sequences
  • Enhance signal-to-noise measurements in real-time sequencing
  • Utilise exomics to elucidate gene families implicated in disease or pharmacogenetic effects
  • Improve mapping in repetitive regions when resequencing

PLUS TWO INTERACTIVE HALF-DAY POST-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS
Wednesday 19th September 2012, Copthorne Tara Hotel, London
A: RNA-sequencing – analytical challenges and data interpretation
Workshop Leader: John Marioni, Group Leader, European Bioinformatics Institute
8.30am - 12.40pm

B: Challenges in bacterial genome sequence data interpretation
Workshop Leader: Lori Snyder, Reader in Biotechnology, Kingston University
1.30pm - 5.40pm

Visit our website here: http://www.smi-online.co.uk/goto/next-generationsequencing6.asp

Alternatively contact Lewis Garfield on tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6186 or
Email:
lgarfield@smi-online.co.uk

“Quote Technology Network and save £100”



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