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  Events - November 2013


Advances in Recombinant Protein Technology 2013

19 Nov 2013 - 20 Nov 2013 - AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, UK



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The ability to produce proteins (as reagents or biotherapeutics) of sufficient quality and quantity is important for the academic and industrial sectors. The use of eukaryotic cells as hosts for expression and recovery of recombinant cellular, membrane or secreted proteins has developed markedly over the past decade. This conference brings together academic and industrial researchers working on eukaryotic cells as protein expression hosts, and will address our current fundamental understanding about molecular events that determine productivity and quality attributes in the use of specific cell hosts for specific protein product categories. 

In particular, the conference will focus on the biology of existing host cells (in terms of competencies for protein expression), structural features associated with success of expression of specific proteins (including the relationships between specific proteins and host cells) and how both host cell and desired proteins may be engineered to generate new (synthetic) systems for enhanced product expression.. Participation will be strictly limited to 220 attendees to enable networking and informal discussion. 

A meeting jointly organised by AstraZeneca, University of Manchester and ELRIG

Click below for more information and delegate registration.



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