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  Events - March 2014


Advances in Biodetection & Biosensors

10 Mar 2014 - 11 Mar 2014 - Berlin, Germany



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SELECTBIO’s highly successful Biodetection & Biosensors is now in its 7th year and is a rapidly growing area of science. This year’s meeting will incorporate aspects of both biodetection and biosensors. Biosensors are small analytical devices that can convert a biological stimulus into an electrical signal which can be for things such as measuring concentrations of substances within the body and are extremely valuable in rapidly detecting when these levels change. For example, biosensors could be extremely valuable to diabetics in rapidly informing the individual when blood glucose levels fluctuate out of normal parameters. The conference will also cover other areas of biodetection, such as field ready pathogen detection devices, which could be very useful in LEDC’s where there is a need for rapid diagnosis of diseases, and no hospitals are available.

The conference will be co-located with Advances in Microarray Technology, Single Cell Analysis Europe and Lab-on-a-Chip. Registered delegates will have unrestricted access to all co-located meetings ensuring a comprehensive learning and sharing experience as well as being financially beneficial for attendees.



Poster Submission Deadline is 11 February 2014



Further information
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