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  Events - December 2013


Label-free quantification using SWATH™ - a wide range of applications in proteomic research

05 Dec 2013 - 05 Dec 2013 - Webinar, 3:00 pm (European winter time, UTC / GMT +01:00)



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Register for this webinar free of charge

Talk 1: Why do we need systematic proteomic analyzes?

Markus-Ralser.gifSpeaker: Dr. Markus Ralser, Principal Investigator, University of Cambridge

Since the introduction of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, this technique has grown rapidly and is about to replace many classical methods of protein analysis. 

Nevertheless, proteomics often still suffers from the reputation of relatively low reproducibility and is the impression created to have contributed relatively manageable for scientific or diagnostic progress. 

During this seminar I will discuss some of the possible reasons for this and introduce new technologies that act where classical proteomics still provide opportunities for improvement.

Who should attend?
Scientists interested in proteomics, but who doesn’t use them yet.
Students and scientists who use proteomics for quantitative analysis and are interested in high-throughput technologies.

Talk 2: High-throughput quantification of proteins by combination of micro-flow HPLC-MS and SWATH™

Jakob-Vowinckel.gifSpeaker: Dr. Jacob Vowinckel, Research Associate, University of Cambridge
  • Classical methods for the simultaneous quantification of hundreds of proteins achieve greater flexibility and throughput in combination with isotope-free quantitation techniques such as SWATH MS.

  • A limitation of most commonly used proteomic methods is the low sample throughput due to long HPLC gradient. Disclosed is a method in which the benefits can be combined from short micro-flow gradient with data-independent proteomics recording strategies.
  • The advantages of this new strategy are in particular in the field of validation of marker proteins and in systems biology.
Who should attend?
Scientist with background in proteomics, who are interested in label-free methods, SWATH MS, and high throughput proteomics.

Participation to this online seminar is free of charge and will be held in German language.

Interactive: During the presentation, you can ask your questions online to the experts by chat.


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