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Product Description
E-Fly2 150 pixels JPEG1.jpgKBiosystems’ EFly2 Semi Automated Thermal microplate and microtube sealer is ideal for low to medium throughput laboratories that requires a reliable, consistent sealing system. Offering complete, versatility, the EFly2, will work with a wide range of plates for PCR, assay and compound storage microplates and can be used for standard and deep well microplates and tubes. The manually operated variants are operated via the display panel on the front of the machine and allow the ability to choose temperature and sealing time.

Key features:
Operator Friendly – Easy to program and operator friendly

– The EFly2 works with a wide range of microplates and tube racks with plate stage inserts to allow use of more unusual microplate types.

– Able to use all seal types across a large number of applications.

– Engineered with robustness in mind

– Small footprint and very light to use as little space as possible on a workbench.
Product EFly2
Company KBiosystems
Price Request a quote
More Information View company product page
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Units 5 to 10 Paycocke Close Basildon Essex

Tel: +44 (0) 1268 522431
Fax: +44 (0) 1268 270231

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