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Rediscover Richard III, Explore the $1000 Genome and More at the 2013 International Symposium on Human Identification

Published: Thursday, August 15, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, August 15, 2013
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24th International Symposium on Human Identification provides an opportunity for DNA analysts, members of law enforcement and other DNA industry professionals to learn about emerging forensic DNA techniques from experts in the field.

The symposium will be held October 7-10 at the Hyatt Regency, 235 Peachtree Street NE, Atlanta, Georgia.

ISHI 2013 will explore advances in next generation sequencing, rapid DNA analysis, mixture interpretation and other current topics in human identification. This year's presenters and panelists include:

•    Kevin Davies, Ph.D. : The 2013 ISHI keynote speaker, Kevin Davies, is the author of Cracking the Genome and The $1000 Genome and the current editor-in-chief of Bio-IT World, a monthly magazine covering technology in the life sciences. From personal genome mapping to human genetic sequencing, Davies' books explore the current and potential impact genomic science has on everyday life. His talk will explore the impact that affordable personal genetic testing may have on the future of personal medicine and beyond.
•    Turi King, Ph.D. : A lecturer in Genetics and Archaeology in the University of Leicester's Department of Genetics and manager of the Leverhulme-funded project The Impact of Diasporas on the Making of Britain, Turi King is a member of the team that discovered the remains of Richard III in a Leicester parking lot in 2012. She will be discussing her experience on that project and the fortuitous events that led up to the discovery and the identification of the remains aided by forensic DNA analysis.
•    Greg Hampikian, Ph.D. : Best known as a volunteer forensic DNA expert on various cases for the Innocence Project, Greg Hampikian will present two talks at ISHI 2013, including one about his experience on the Amanda Knox case. Hampikian has a joint appointment in the departments of Biology and Criminal Justice at Boise State University and is a Charter Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. His second presentation will focus on his pioneering work on Nullomers-amino acids the body doesn't specifically code for but are theoretically possible. Using Nullomers, Hampikian has invented a method of tagging forensic DNA samples to prevent contamination of forensic evidence.
•    Jennifer Schuett and Tim Cromie : In August 1990, eight-year-old Jennifer Schuett was abducted from her home, raped and left for dead in a field after her attacker slit her throat. Though her case went cold, thanks in part to the dogged efforts of Detective Tim Cromie, her attacker was brought to justice 19 years later. Today Schuett helps other victims of violent crimes persevere and heal through Justice for Jennifer . Together, Cromie and Schuett will present their case at ISHI 2013. A law enforcement professional since 1985, Cromie has been with the Dickinson Police Department in Galveston, Texas, since 1999. He has won multiple awards for his meritorious service.

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