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Study Finds ‘Microbial Clock’ may Help Determine Time of Death

Published: Monday, October 21, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, October 21, 2013
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An intriguing study may provide a powerful new tool in the quiver of forensic scientists attempting to determine the time of death.


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