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GE, NetBio to Validate Fully Integrated Rapid DNA system

Published: Friday, March 21, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, March 27, 2014
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Verification by forensic laboratories is a key step toward responsible adoption for crime laboratory and in-the-field law enforcement use.

GE Healthcare Life Sciences and NetBio announce that an extensive developmental validation of DNAscan™ Rapid DNA Analysis™ System has commenced. The studies will evaluate the overall system from swab-in to profile-out, including the instrument, NetBio BioChipSet™ Cassette, STR chemistry, and data interpretation by the on-board Expert System Software. The software enables fully automated data analysis which will be critical to Rapid DNA Analysis realizing its full potential outside the laboratory. This approach to validation will pave the way for future uptake of Rapid DNA by crime laboratories and police stations globally.

Mike Benevento, General Manager, Human Identification, GE Healthcare Life Sciences, said: "Rapid DNA analysis will significantly increase the speed with which DNA supports the investigation of crimes and is predicted to substantially reduce violent and property crime over time. Together with NetBio, we are committed to the responsible adoption of DNAscan Rapid DNA Analysis System which is essential to successfully realizing this potential, not just in the United States, but globally. We are working closely with the FBI, SWGDAM (Scientific Working Group for DNA Analysis Methods), and others in the forensic and law enforcement communities to take a considered, step-wise approach to the introduction of the DNAscan System."

Developmental validation of the system comprises an extensive series of tests to verify that results generated (STR profiles) are reliable and reproducible. A working group which includes five accredited forensic laboratories is independently generating and analyzing data from the DNAscan System. This verification process, which includes meeting an extensive set of FBI Quality Assurance Standards, is expected by the forensic science community for any new scientific technology being introduced into the criminal justice system. Following analysis, the results will be used to seek National DNA Index System (NDIS) approval which will allow forensic laboratories to submit the STR profiles generated by the DNAscan System to the U.S. national DNA database (CODIS). NDIS approval is also a critical step toward the ultimate goal of obtaining approval for use in the police station.


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