Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Forensic Science & Clinical Toxicology
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

AAFS Announces 2014-15 Officers and Board of Directors

Published: Tuesday, April 01, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Bookmark and Share
The American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) is governed by an 18-member board of directors, which includes 11 Academy members who are elected by their respective sections.

Serving as 2014-15 officers are: Daniel A. Martell, PhD, president; Susan M. Ballou, MS, vice president; John E. Gerns, MFS, secretary; Barry K. Logan, PhD, past president; Victor W. Weedn, MD, JD, president-elect; Robert B.J. Dorion, DDS, vice president; and Betty Layne DesPortes, JD, treasurer. 

The 2014-15 board of directors are: Laura C. Fulginiti, PhD; Lucy A. Davis, BHS; David W. Baker, MFS; Julie A. Howe, MBA;Roderick T. Kennedy, JD; John P. Kenney, DDS, MS; Gregory G. Davis, MD; John L. Young, MD, MS; Jane A. Lewis, MFS; andRuth E. Winecker, PhD.

Dr. Martell is an AAFS Fellow and the first forensic psychologist to become president of the Academy. He will carry forward the important work of AAFS by encouraging multi-disciplinary divergent approaches to a common forensic problem or issue.  A focus on international collaboration, mentoring, education and stimulating the future of forensic sciences by engaging young forensic scientists, distinguished fellows and past presidents will carry forward the vital, credible work of the forensic sciences and its application to the legal system.

"Multi-disciplinary, internationally collaborative efforts of the forensic sciences community strengthens our ability to enhance the techniques, technologies and processes that drive the core mission of AAFS and its members – to provide credible, unbiased, scientifically proven evidence to the judicial system.  Working with governments, law enforcement and the legal system, we will continue to strengthen the science that is applied to the law," says Martell.  "We will also continue to foster best practices and cultivate future generations of forensic scientists who, by the rigorous training and requirements of AAFS, will carry forward legitimate forensic sciences," he said.

Martell is the forensic neuropsychologist for the forensic litigation consulting firm of Park Dietz & Associates and the Threat Assessment Group, Inc. in Newport Beach, CA.  A cum laude psychology graduate from Washington and Jefferson College, Martell earned his master's and PhD degrees in Clinical Psychology at the University of Virginia.  He is a member of several highly esteemed associations and was awarded a research grant from the National Science Foundation to study violent criminal behavior among the homeless and mentally ill.


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,400+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
DNA Could Put a Face to the Crime in the Future
An Irish geneticist is pioneering forensic techniques that can estimate a person’s appearance from a DNA sample.
Fingerprint Accuracy Stays The Same Over Time
Researchers have shown that fingerprint recognition accuracy remains stable in subjects apprehended multiple times over a period of 5 to 12 years.
Teeth Reveal Lifetime Exposures to Metals, Toxins
Researchers have identified dental biomarkers to reveal links between early iron exposure and late life brain diseases.
Better DNA Analysis for Catching Criminals
A simple, lower-cost new method for DNA profiling of human hairs developed by the University of Adelaide should improve opportunities to link criminals to serious crimes.
The Perfect Partnership: Research & Industry; Software & Instrumentation. It really starts to come together at ASMS 2015
Collaboration and knowledge-sharing were evident everywhere: on the bus, in the hallways and in the bars. This article aims to capture this theme and share with you some of the fruits of this coming together of science and industry.
Are Microbes the Future of Forensic Science?
Forget checking for latent prints or impression evidence, forensic scientists of the future might use skin microbiology to pin a suspect at the crime scene.
New Test Detects Drug Use From A Single Fingerprint
Research published in the journal Analyst has demonstrated a new, non-invasive test that can detect cocaine use through a simple fingerprint.
Potential Forensic Uses for Human Microbiome
A recent study suggests microbial communities found on or in some sites in an individual's body can be used as fingerprint-like identifiers.
Crime Scene Discovery – Separating The DNA Of Identical Twins
Forensic scientist Dr Graham Williams uncovers one of the DNA’s longstanding mysteries.
‘Fracture’ Prints, Not Fingerprints, Help Solve Child Abuse Cases
Much like a finger leaves its own unique print to help identify a person, researchers are now discovering that skull fractures leave certain signatures that can help investigators better determine what caused the injury.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,400+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!