Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Scientists Complete Sequencing Tibetan Antelope Genome

Published: Monday, December 28, 2009
Last Updated: Monday, December 28, 2009
Bookmark and Share
The genome sequencing is expected to explain the pathogenesis of chronic plateau sickness.

BGI and Qinghai University have completed sequencing the genome of Tibetan antelopes, which will hopefully explain the pathogenesis of chronic plateau sickness.  

Tibetan antelopes, a peculiar species on China's Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, have been given the highest level of protection under the United Nations' Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species since 1979, and listed among the most endangered species by the Chinese Government since 1988.

They are considered to be ideal species for evolution studies, as they had lived on "the Roof of the World" for millions of years against the backdrop of various environmental extremes, such as extreme cold and low oxygen levels.

"By sequencing the Tibetan antelope genome, we have laid the scientific foundation to decode the pathogenesis of chronic plateau sickness," said Yang Huanming, an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and a participant of the project.

"The studies can also contribute to improving the health of the plateau inhabitants, especially those of Tibetan ethnic group that has lived on the plateau generations after generations," he said.  

"Sequencing the Tibetan antelope genome also lays the genetic foundation for us to carry out plateau life sciences studies, but it is only the first step," said Gerili, vice president of the Qinghai University and standing director of the International Society for Mountain Medicine.

"We will further identify the functors on the genome, decode all the genetic information, and explore the genetic basis of Tibetan antelopes' ability to evolve and to adapt to harsh environment," he said.

It is the first genome sequencing of plateau endangered species in the world, he added.

The project was jointly launched by the Qinghai University and BGI, Shenzhen in April this year. In addition to Tibetan antelopes, scientists in BGI are working to sequence the genomes of penguins and polar bears in the project.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,300+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

BGI Opens Genome Research Center in Europe
The company opens its first European Genome Research Center located in Copenhagen Bio Science Park (COBIS).
Friday, February 10, 2012
BGI and GT Life Sciences Announce Complete Sequencing of CHO Genome
CHO whole genome sequence data has been assembled and early access is now available.
Monday, January 10, 2011
Beijing Genomics Institute Signs Global Site License with CLC bio for Sequencing Software Platform
The global site license agreement, for CLC Genomics Workbench, covers all researchers at all BGI sites, both inside and outside of China.
Friday, July 04, 2008
Scientific News
Liquid Biopsies: Miracle Diagnostic or Next New Fad?
Thanks to the development of highly specific gene-amplification and sequencing technologies liquid biopsies access more biomarkers relevant to more cancers than ever before.
Cancer Gene-Drug Combinations Ripe for Precision Medicine
The study aims to expand the number of cancer gene mutations that can be paired with a precision therapy.
Targeting BRAF Mutations in Thyroid Cancer
Treating metastatic thyroid cancer patients harboring a BRAF mutation with vemurafenib showed anti-tumor activity in a third of patients.
Colon Cancer Blocked in Mice
Case Western Reserve University Researchers block common type of colon cancer tumour in mice, laying groundwork for human clinical trial.
Cancer Related Immune Response Genes Uncovered
Researchers at the SBP have identified over 100 new genetic regions that affect the immune response to cancer.
New Therapeutic Targets For Small Cell Lung Cancer Identified
Researchers at UTSW Medical Center have identified a protein termed ASCL1 that is essential to the development of small cell lung cancer.
Deciphering Inactive X Chromosomes
Untangling the Barr body of inactive X chromosomes valuable for understanding chromosome structure and gene expression.
Micro Disease-Detecting Sensor Created
Researchers at McMaster University have created a microscopic disease-detecting sensor that can turn on to detect trace amounts of substances.
Liquid Biopsies Treating Ovarian Cancer
Researchers have discovered a promising monitor and treat recurrence of ovarian cancer. Detecting cancer long before tumours reappear.
Uncovering a New Principle in Chemotherapy Resistance in Breast Cancer
The NIH study has revealed an entirely unexpected process for acquiring drug resistance that bypasses the need to re-establish DNA damage repair in breast cancers that have mutant BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,300+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,800+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!