Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Fox Chase Offers Advanced Cancer Patients a Blueprint of Their Cancer Genes

Published: Wednesday, January 09, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, January 09, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Blueprint could help guide treatment for patients who have exhausted all other options.

Fox Chase Cancer Center, a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, is now offering patients with advanced cancer a cutting-edge clinical test that will provide them with a unique blueprint of their cancer genes.

The new clinical test, known as CancerCode-45TM, evaluates an individual’s tumor for genetic alterations in a select group of 45 genes and gives physicians the opportunity to look at the alterations and be even more precise when choosing a course of treatment. The test is being offered through the Cancer Genome Institute at Fox Chase—one of only a few centers in the nation to offer such pioneering technology in cancer molecular diagnostics.

“Gaining insight like this into the DNA of a specific tumor is the next step in transforming cancer care and prevailing over cancer,” says Michael V. Seiden, MD, PhD, president and CEO of Fox Chase. “We are very excited to be offering this innovative test at our Center and look forward to the ways it will enhance the care we provide our patients.”

Using leading-edge technology, physicians and scientists at Fox Chase are able to perform the CancerCode-45 test and analyze the genetic information in the DNA of a patient’s tumor to find changes that are crucial to supporting their cancer.  This genetic analysis will examine multiple alterations in 45 cancer-related genes and provide a report to the patient’s treating physician.

Prior to the CancerCode-45 test being performed, patients will need to see a Fox Chase physician to provide information about their background, medical history, current medications, and ability to perform daily activities. In addition, the physician will need to take a blood sample and a sample of the tumor (which can come from a previous surgery or biopsy that the patient might have had). It takes about 20 working days to get each patient’s test results.

“Not every patient will benefit from this test, but for some it could very well change their entire course of treatment and significantly prolong their life,” says Jeff Boyd, PhD, executive director of the Cancer Genome Institute at Fox Chase. “At the very least, the results may help physicians decide how to treat their patients with advanced cancer—whether by suggesting they use a particular type of drug or not use a particular type of drug or by allowing them to take part in clinical trials of new medications guided by their tumor’s genetic profile.”

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Scientists Find a New Way to Boost Common Cancer Drugs
Blocking a particular pathway in the cell makes it easier for drugs to annihilate tumors.
Wednesday, January 16, 2013
Researchers Develop a New Cell and Animal Model of Inflammatory Breast Cancer
The new model, developed by researchers at the Fox Chase Cancer Center, may provide scientists with a better understanding of the disease and help with developing effective intervention.
Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Fox Chase Researchers Uncover One Force behind the MYC Oncogene in Many Cancers
Researchers discover how embryonic gene, DLX5, may cause cancers in adults.
Monday, August 03, 2009
Inverted DNA Turns Quiet Developmental Gene into a Potent Driver of T-Cell Lymphoma
A gene crucial for embryonic development can quickly become a potent cancer promoter in adult mice after a genetic misalignment, according to researchers.
Friday, February 29, 2008
Scientific News
Genes That Protect African Children From Developing Malaria Identified
Variations in DNA at a specific location on the genome that protect African children from developing severe malaria, in some cases nearly halving a child’s chance of developing the life-threatening disease, have been identified in the largest genetic association study of malaria to date.
Researchers Disguise Drugs As Platelets to Target Cancer
Researchers have for the first time developed a technique that coats anticancer drugs in membranes made from a patient’s own platelets.
Dormant Viral Genes May Awaken to Cause ALS
NIH human and mouse study may open an unexplored path for finding treatments.
Scientists Create World’s Largest Catalog of Human Genomic Variation
An international team of scientists from the 1000 Genomes Project Consortium has created the world’s largest catalog of genomic differences among humans, providing researchers with powerful clues to help them establish why some people are susceptible to various diseases.
Five Genetic Regions Implicated In Cystic Fibrosis Severity
An international consortium of researchers conducted the largest-ever CF genome-wide analysis to find new therapeutic targets.
Greater Understanding Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
A new genetic study of over 200,000 women reveals the underlying mechanisms of polycystic ovary syndrome, as well as potential interventions.
New Autism Genes Are Revealed in Largest-Ever Study
Work draws more detailed picture of genetic risk, sheds light on sex differences in diagnosis.
A Fundamental Protection Mechanism Against Formalin In Mammals is Revealed
Formaldehyde, or formalin, is well known to all of us as a common chemical used in many industrial processes and also as a preservative, remarkably we also produce formaldehyde in our bodies.
A New Single-Molecule Tool to Observe Enzymes at Work
A team of scientists at the University of Washington and the biotechnology company Illumina have created an innovative tool to directly detect the delicate, single-molecule interactions between DNA and enzymatic proteins.
Genetic Adaptations to Diet and Climate
Researchers found genetic variations in the Inuit of Greenland that reflect adaptations to their specific diet and climate.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos