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Leading Cancer Researcher Appointed NIMHD Clinical Director

Published: Friday, January 25, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, January 24, 2013
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Dr. Reed will oversee outpatient, inpatient, epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory based studies.

The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) of the National Institutes of Health has announced that Eddie Reed, M.D., an award-winning physician and internationally recognized cancer researcher, will serve as the clinical director for the NIMHD Intramural Research Program.

“Dr. Reed is a world renowned oncologist with extensive experience managing clinical trials and translating science into health,” said NIMHD Director John Ruffin, Ph.D.

Ruffin continued, “The breadth of his knowledge of health disparities and public health and the depth of his experience in cancer pharmacology will serve us well as we build the clinical research program within the NIMHD Intramural Research Program.”

Prior to joining NIMHD, Dr. Reed most recently served as professor of oncologic sciences and Abraham Mitchell Distinguished Investigator at the University of South Alabama’s Mitchell Cancer Institute, Mobile, where he has worked closely with the state of Alabama on life-saving cancer screening and control programs.

Dr. Reed has previously served as a tenured scientist, chief of the Clinical Pharmacology Branch, and chief of the Ovarian Cancer and Metastatic Prostate Cancer Clinic in the Division of Clinical Science at the National Cancer Institute (NCI); director of the Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center at West Virginia University, Morgantown; and director of the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr. Reed’s clinical research has primarily been focused on DNA damage and repair in cancer cells in response to pharmacological anticancer agents.

He has conducted more than four dozen phase I or phase II clinical trials of these agents and received two United States Public Health Service Commendation Medals for his work on the clinical development of the powerful anti-cancer agent, paclitaxel.

Paclitaxel is used to treat a variety of cancers including lung, breast, ovarian, and head and neck cancers. He has also collaborated on many public health cancer prevention, screening, and control programs throughout his career many of which were focused on reducing health disparities.

Dr. Reed received his undergraduate degree from Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Ark., and his medical degree from Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn. He completed his internship and residency at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., and a fellowship at NCI in Bethesda, Md.

He is board certified in internal medicine and has been listed as a Top Doctor by the US News and World Report. He served on the Institute of Medicine’s National Cancer Policy Forum from 2005-2008. He has also served on the National Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health Disparities.

As clinical director, Dr. Reed will oversee a combination of studies including outpatient, inpatient, epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory based studies.

He will build a multi- and inter-disciplinary research program geared to translating basic research into clinical trials and ultimately interventions.

He will lead the NIMHD effort in enhancing the recruitment and retention of minorities and other underserved populations in clinical trials.


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