Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Leading Cancer Researcher Appointed NIMHD Clinical Director

Published: Friday, January 25, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, January 24, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Dr. Reed will oversee outpatient, inpatient, epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory based studies.

The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) of the National Institutes of Health has announced that Eddie Reed, M.D., an award-winning physician and internationally recognized cancer researcher, will serve as the clinical director for the NIMHD Intramural Research Program.

“Dr. Reed is a world renowned oncologist with extensive experience managing clinical trials and translating science into health,” said NIMHD Director John Ruffin, Ph.D.

Ruffin continued, “The breadth of his knowledge of health disparities and public health and the depth of his experience in cancer pharmacology will serve us well as we build the clinical research program within the NIMHD Intramural Research Program.”

Prior to joining NIMHD, Dr. Reed most recently served as professor of oncologic sciences and Abraham Mitchell Distinguished Investigator at the University of South Alabama’s Mitchell Cancer Institute, Mobile, where he has worked closely with the state of Alabama on life-saving cancer screening and control programs.

Dr. Reed has previously served as a tenured scientist, chief of the Clinical Pharmacology Branch, and chief of the Ovarian Cancer and Metastatic Prostate Cancer Clinic in the Division of Clinical Science at the National Cancer Institute (NCI); director of the Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center at West Virginia University, Morgantown; and director of the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr. Reed’s clinical research has primarily been focused on DNA damage and repair in cancer cells in response to pharmacological anticancer agents.

He has conducted more than four dozen phase I or phase II clinical trials of these agents and received two United States Public Health Service Commendation Medals for his work on the clinical development of the powerful anti-cancer agent, paclitaxel.

Paclitaxel is used to treat a variety of cancers including lung, breast, ovarian, and head and neck cancers. He has also collaborated on many public health cancer prevention, screening, and control programs throughout his career many of which were focused on reducing health disparities.

Dr. Reed received his undergraduate degree from Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Ark., and his medical degree from Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn. He completed his internship and residency at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., and a fellowship at NCI in Bethesda, Md.

He is board certified in internal medicine and has been listed as a Top Doctor by the US News and World Report. He served on the Institute of Medicine’s National Cancer Policy Forum from 2005-2008. He has also served on the National Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health Disparities.

As clinical director, Dr. Reed will oversee a combination of studies including outpatient, inpatient, epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory based studies.

He will build a multi- and inter-disciplinary research program geared to translating basic research into clinical trials and ultimately interventions.

He will lead the NIMHD effort in enhancing the recruitment and retention of minorities and other underserved populations in clinical trials.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Dementia Linked to Deficient DNA Repair
Mutant forms of breast cancer factor 1 (BRCA1) are associated with breast and ovarian cancers but according to new findings, in the brain the normal BRCA1 gene product may also be linked to Alzheimer’s disease.
Tuesday, December 01, 2015
Batten Disease may Benefit from Gene Therapy
NIH-funded animal study suggests one-shot approach to injecting genes.
Friday, November 13, 2015
NIH Researchers Link Single Gene Variation to Obesity
Variation in the BDNF gene may affect brain’s regulation of appetite, study suggests.
Saturday, October 31, 2015
Researchers Identify Potential Alternative to CRISPR-Cas Genome Editing Tools
New Cas enzymes shed light on evolution of CRISPR-Cas systems.
Saturday, October 31, 2015
Potential Alternative to CRISPR-Cas Genome Editing Tools
New Cas enzymes shed light on evolution of CRISPR-Cas systems.
Friday, October 23, 2015
Charting Genetic Variation Across the Globe
An international team of scientists has created the world’s largest catalog of human genetic differences in populations around the globe.
Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Gene Therapy Staves Off Blindness from Retinitis Pigmentosa in Canine Model
NIH-funded study suggests therapeutic window may extend to later-stage disease.
Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Scientists Develop Genetic Blueprint of Inner Ear Cell Development
Two studies in mice use new technique to provide insight into cell development critical for hearing, balance.
Saturday, October 17, 2015
NIH Breast Cancer Research to Focus On Prevention
A new phase of the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP), focused on prevention, is being launched at the National Institutes of Health.
Friday, October 09, 2015
NIH Grantees Win 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry
The 2015 Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to NIH grantees Paul Modrich, Ph.D., of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, N.C.; and Aziz Sancar, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C.,.
Thursday, October 08, 2015
New Gene Therapy for Vision Loss From a Mitochondrial Disease
NIH-funded study shows success in targeting mitochondrial DNA in mice.
Tuesday, October 06, 2015
NIH Funding Targets Gaps in Biomedical Research
New awards support emerging issues in cutting-edge biomedical research fields.
Tuesday, October 06, 2015
Scientists Test New Gene Therapy for Vision Loss from a Mitochondrial Disease
NIH-funded study shows success in targeting mitochondrial DNA in mice.
Tuesday, October 06, 2015
Dormant Viral Genes May Awaken to Cause ALS
NIH human and mouse study may open an unexplored path for finding treatments.
Thursday, October 01, 2015
Scientists Create World’s Largest Catalog of Human Genomic Variation
An international team of scientists from the 1000 Genomes Project Consortium has created the world’s largest catalog of genomic differences among humans, providing researchers with powerful clues to help them establish why some people are susceptible to various diseases.
Thursday, October 01, 2015
Scientific News
Revolutionary Technologies Developed to Improve Outcomes for Lung Cancer Patients
Breath test to detect lung cancer brings oxygen directly to the wound.
Dementia Linked to Deficient DNA Repair
Mutant forms of breast cancer factor 1 (BRCA1) are associated with breast and ovarian cancers but according to new findings, in the brain the normal BRCA1 gene product may also be linked to Alzheimer’s disease.
New Gene Map Reveals Cancer’s Achilles’ Heel
Team of researchers switches off almost 18,000 genes
New Discovery Sheds Light on Disease Risk
Gaps between genes interact to influence the risk of acquiring disease.
Mathematical Model Helps Show How Zebrafish Get Their Stripes
The iconic yellow and blue stripes of zebrafish form dynamically as young fish develop and grow. A mathematical model developed by Brown University researchers helps to show how pigment cells interact to form the pattern.
Epigenome Influenced by Habitat and Lifestyle
Study on Pygmy hunter-gatherer populations and Bantu farmers in Central Africa shows that habitat and lifestyle can impact the epigenome.
Shining Light on Microbial Growth and Death Inside our Guts
Precise measurement of microbial populations in gastrointestinal tracts could be key to identifying novel therapies.
New Tech Vastly Improves CRISPR/Cas9 Accuracy
A new CRISPR/Cas9 technology developed by scientists at UMass Medical School is precise enough to surgically edit DNA at nearly any genomic location, while avoiding potentially harmful off-target changes typically seen in standard CRISPR gene editing techniques.
New Class of RNA Tumor Suppressors Identified
Two short, “housekeeping” RNA molecules block cancer growth by binding to an important cancer-associated protein called KRAS. More than a quarter of all human cancers are missing these RNAs.
Biologists Induce Flatworms to Grow Heads and Brains of Other Species
Findings shed light on role of a new kind of epigenetic signaling in evolution, could yield clues for understanding birth defects and regeneration.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos