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DNASTAR’s De Novo Bacterial Genome Assembly Application

Published: Thursday, January 31, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, January 31, 2013
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Company has added genome assembly application to Illumina’s BaseSpace apps.

DNASTAR® has announced that it has added a de novo bacterial genome assembly application to Illumina’s BaseSpace Apps, Illumina’s dedicated applications store and informatics community dedicated to advancing genomic analysis.

The DNASTAR de novo bacterial genome assembly app supports rapid assembly of Illumina sequence reads using DNASTAR’s proprietary SeqMan NGen program and patented assembly algorithms.

As the only de novo assembly app on BaseSpace, DNASTAR’s app provides convenient functionality to Illumina customers that would not otherwise be available to them in BaseSpace.

Tom Schwei, Vice President and General Manager of DNASTAR, commented, “DNASTAR has long been known as a company that provides outstanding software to life scientists on their desktop computers. This new BaseSpace app represents the first expansion of our offering into the cloud. We are delighted to provide our software capabilities to Illumina customers in BaseSpace. Users will now have a new way to accomplish their research objectives, with the same positive user experience and customer support that they’ve come to expect from DNASTAR throughout our long history serving this market.”

DNASTAR’s de novo bacterial genome assembly app will allow life scientists to assemble paired-end reads from Illumina HiSeq or MiSeq instruments directly in BaseSpace.

Results can initially be visualized by launching a genome browser from within BaseSpace.

In addition, users of the app will be provided with a free trial version of DNASTAR Lasergene to support further analysis of the de novo assembly results, including visualization, gap closure, scaffold building and contig alignment.

Informatics solutions available through BaseSpace Apps will allow customers to utilize the tools from a growing community of academic, commercial, and open source providers.

To demonstrate the utility of this rapidly growing toolset, BaseSpace customers will have free access to all of the BaseSpace Apps until January 1, 2013.


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