Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Life Technologies Launches Two Ion AmpliSeq™ Community Panel Designs

Published: Wednesday, April 03, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, April 03, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Company has launched Ion AmpliSeq™ BRCA1 and BRCA2 Panel and the Ion AmpliSeq™ Colon & Lung Cancer Panel.

Life Technologies Corporation has announced that it has launched two Ion AmpliSeq™ Community Panels: the Ion AmpliSeq™ BRCA1 and BRCA2 Panel design and the Ion AmpliSeq™ Colon and Lung Cancer Panel design.

The BRCA panel analyzes the coding regions of the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, which have been implicated in hereditary breast and ovarian cancers.

The colon and lung panel analyzes more than 500 mutations in 22 associated genes, using the power and simplicity of the established Ion AmpliSeq™ technology.

Significant and ongoing improvements with Ion sequencing have enabled these Ion AmpliSeq™ panels to accurately call all variants of interest, including those within difficult sequence contexts.

Life Technologies is hosting three talks at the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) on Saturday, April 6 about the use of Ion AmpliSeq™ panels in clinical research:

• Nicola Normanno, MD, Centro Ricerche Oncologiche di Mercogliano, Avellino, Italy, will discuss the development of the Ion AmpliSeq™ Lung and Colon Community Panel and the collaborative efforts of the eight-member European consortia.
• Marina Nikiforova, MD, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania will discuss using the Ion AmpliSeq™ RNA Panels for detection of chromosomal rearrangements in thyroid cancer research.
• Six panelists will discuss implementing Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Gene Panels on the Ion PGM™ System for clinical research.

Ion AmpliSeq™ Community Panels are developed by leading scientists who draw on their expertise in a specific disease area to develop the panels.

They verify the content using samples that were previously screened using orthogonal technologies. The panel designs are then made available to the entire scientific community on

Ion AmpliSeq™ Community Panels are built on the same breakthrough technology that powers the Ion AmpliSeq™ Ready-to-Use Panels and the Ion AmpliSeq™ Custom Panels.

Like all Ion AmpliSeq™ technology, the community panels require just 10 ng of DNA input per primer pool, about 25-fold less than alternative gene panel approaches.

The Ion AmpliSeq™ workflow is a simple PCR reaction coupled with rapid Ion semiconductor sequencing, enabling researchers to go from DNA to results in less than 24 hours.

The Ion AmpliSeq™ BRCA1 and BRCA2 panels were developed by Drs. Marjolijn Ligtenberg and Arjen Mensenkamp from Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands, and with Drs. Jose Carlos Machado and Jose Luis Costa from The Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology of the University of Porto.

In addition to these leading researchers in the field, a global consortium will further test the panel, with plans to validate and implement it in their labs.

"Ion AmpliSeq™ technology has allowed us to substantially improve the turnaround time and cost of sequencing these important genes," said Costa. "The methodology proved robust enough to call even difficult mutations, including long homopolymers, in these two genes."

"The Ion AmpliSeq™ BRCA panel enabled us to develop a quick and easy high-throughput workflow, with minimal hands-on time," said Mensenkamp. "It is an accurate solution-of the 65 samples tested to date, we detected all expected mutations."

Life Technologies has announced the community panel program in November with the first Ion AmpliSeq™ Community Panel-the Ion AmpliSeq™ Colon and Lung Cancer Panel design.

The panel analyzes more than 500 mutations in a single-tube assay that requires just 10 ng of DNA input per primer pool, about 25-fold less than alternative gene panel approaches.

The Ion AmpliSeq™ workflow is as simple as a PCR reaction and can be completed in as few as 3.5 hours turnaround time. That panel design is now available on

"The Ion AmpliSeq™ Colon and Lung Cancer panel design permits you to describe a cancer according to the molecular subpopulation that compose the lesion and this is impossible to do with previous methods," said Dr. Aldo Scarpa, Director, Dept. of Pathology and ARC-NET Research Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University of Verona, Italy.

Eight institutions - dubbed the OncoNetwork - participated in the development of the panel: Centro Ricerche Oncologiche Mercogliano, Italy; Leiter Genetik / Molekularbiologie Viollier AG, Switzerland; University of Warwick, UK; Institut Gustave Roussy France; Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands; Universite Paris Descartes Centre, Universitaire des Saints-Peres, France; St James' Hospital, Dublin EIRE and ARC-NET Research Center, University of Verona, Italy.

The Ion AmpliSeq™ panels referenced are For Research Use Only. Not for use in diagnostic procedures.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Life Technologies to Collaborate with Boston Children's Hospital
Collaboration to develop an optimized lab workflow based on the Ion Proton™ sequencer.
Thursday, June 21, 2012
Life Technologies Establishes Global Instrument Center of Excellence in Singapore
Center will design and manufacture Company’s products, including next-generation sequencing and molecular diagnostic instruments.
Friday, June 15, 2012
Scientific News
Genetic Defences of Bacteria Don’t Aid Antibiotic Resistance
Genetic responses to the stresses caused by antibiotics don’t help bacteria to evolve a resistance to the medications, according to a new study by Oxford University researchers.
Tolerant Immune System Increases Cancer Risk
Researchers have found that individuals with high immunoCRIT ratios may have an increased risk of developing certain cancers.
Developing a Gel that Mimics Human Breast for Cancer Research
Scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Nottingham have been funded to develop a gel that will match many of the biological structures of human breast tissue, to advance cancer research and reduce animal testing.
Lung Repair and Regeneration Gene Discovered
New role for hedgehog gene offers better understanding of lung disease.
3 Ways Viruses Have Changed Science for the Better
Viruses are really good at what they do, and we’ve been able to harness their skills to learn about – and potentially improve – human health in several ways.
Mixed Up Cell Transportation Key Piece of ALS and Dementia Puzzle
Researchers from the University of Toronto are one step closer to solving this incredibly complex puzzle, offering hope for treatment.
New Gene Therapy for Vision Loss From a Mitochondrial Disease
NIH-funded study shows success in targeting mitochondrial DNA in mice.
Five New Genetic Variants Linked to Brain Cancer Identified
The biggest ever study of DNA from people with glioma – the most common form of brain cancer – has discovered five new genetic variants associated with the disease.
Predictive Model for Breast Cancer Progression
Biomedical engineers have demonstrated a proof-of-principle technique that could give women and their oncologists more personalized information to help them choose options for treating breast cancer.
Fatty Liver Disease and Scarring Have Strong Genetic Component
Researchers say that hepatic fibrosis, which involves scarring of the liver that can result in dysfunction and, in severe cases, cirrhosis and cancer, may be as much a consequence of genetics as environmental factors.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos