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New Primers Provide Enhanced KRAS Assay Sensitivity

Published: Wednesday, April 10, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, April 10, 2013
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Swift Biosciences, Inc. has announced the third product in its line of myT® Primer reagents for the detection of cancer mutations.

myT KRAS provides 1% sensitivity for 7 key mutations in codons 12 and 13 with little or no breakthrough amplification from wild-type, resulting in an assay with a definitive Yes/No answer over a wide dynamic range. myT KRAS works well with both fresh frozen and FFPE samples. Each package includes sufficient reagents for 30 samples and is now available directly from Swift.Swift-Biosciences-myT-KRAS.gif

myT Primers have unique structural and thermodynamic properties that enable highly sensitive mismatch discrimination. The selectivity and reproducibility of myT Primers provides an increased level of confidence and convenience in qPCR assays and results in an assay that gives a definitive Yes/No answer over a wide dynamic range, eliminating the need to use a delta Ct method to call a result. myT Primers are ideal for use when the sample material is limiting or where the target is present at very low concentration.  

myT KRAS is the third product in the myT Primer line. myT BRAF, can detect 1% mutant BRAF V600E/K. A second, ultrasensitive version, called myT BRAF-Ultra, provides 0.01% sensitivity down to single copy detection of BRAF V600E/K mutations. Additional myT Primer reagents will be coming soon.


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