Satellite Banner
Genomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Discovered the Role of Noncoding 5S rRNA in Protecting the p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene

Published: Thursday, July 04, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, July 04, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Over 50% of tumors are associated with mutations in p53.

Researchers of the Cancer Metabolism group at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Oncology Institute (ICO) and the Division of Hematology-Oncology of the University of Cincinnati, led by George Thomas, have discovered a role for ribosomal 5S RNA in the formation of a complex that regulates the stability of p53. Normally, p53 prevents healthy cells from becoming tumorigenic. It is maintained at low levels when cells function properly and increases when there is a cellular damage.

The results have been published in the online edition of Cell Reports.

Cell growth

The ability of cells to grow is directly related to the amount of protein synthesized by ribosomes, the intracellular machinery responsible for translating messenger RNA transcribed from DNA into amino acids containing proteins. Misregulation of ribosome biogenesis is associated with extreme forms of aberrant cell growth including anemia and cancer.

Activation of p53 leads to the induction of a cell death program, preventing aberrantly growing cells from initiating tumor development. In normal conditions, p53 is kept at low levels to avoid damaging healthy cells. The chief enzyme that maintains low levels of p53 is Hdm2, which under normal growth conditions degrades p53.

Ribosomes themselves are composed of two subunits termed 40S and 60S. The formation of the 60S involves many molecular constituents, including L5, L11 and 5S rRNA, which form a pre-ribosomal complex before being incorporated into the mature 60S subunit. The Thomas team have shown that when there is damage to ribosomes, or potentially when ribosome biogenesis is hyperactivated, the L5/L11/5S rRNA pre-ribosomal complex is redirected from nascent ribosomes to the binding and inhibition of Hdm2, allowing p53 to rise, leading to cell death.
 
Recently, the Thomas team showed that L5 and L11 regulate Hdm2 in a mutually dependent manner. Now, Giulio Donati, the first author of these studies, has demonstrated the existence of the L5/L11/5S rRNA pre-ribosomal complex and its role as a tumor suppressor. Strikingly, they also show that the same 5S rRNA species that regulates Hdm2 is also a positive effector of Hdm4, a negative regulator of p53. These findings point to an ancient evolutionary link between ribosome biogenesis and cancer.

Over 50% of tumors

Thomas explained that understanding how p53 is regulated and functions is critical as "more than 50% of tumors have mutations in p53 or overexpress Hdm2 or Hdm4, which blocks the activity of p53". Thomas adds that "we are currently working on the design of a clinical trial, with the Ramon Salazar team (ICO) based on activating Hdm2-p53 checkpoint to kill tumor cells".


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,400+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Keeping Growth in Check
Ribosomal proteins RPL5 and RPL11 play an essential role in normal cell proliferation.
Friday, December 13, 2013
Key Role of a Protein in the Segregation of Genetic Material During Cell Division
Researchers at IDIBELL have reported an article which delves into the regulator mechanisms of mitosis.
Wednesday, December 11, 2013
Discovered a Mechanism that Induces Migration of Tumor Cells in Liver Cancer
Coordinated overactivation of TGFb and CXCR4 signaling pathways confer migratory properties to the hepatocellular carcinoma cells.
Wednesday, November 06, 2013
Researchers Discover the Genetic Signature of Highly Aggressive Small Lung Tumors
A study conducted by the IDIBELL allows to identify this type of cancer at an early stage and adapt the treatment.
Thursday, October 03, 2013
Discovered Epigenetic Alterations in the Brain of Alzheimer's Patients
Alzheimer disease is becoming a major health problem in Western societies, exacerbated by the progressive aging of the population.
Monday, September 16, 2013
High Levels of RANK Protein Interferes with the Differentiation of Mammary Cells
Levels of this protein increase with age, which could explain the increase in breast cancer risk associated with age.
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
The Epigenome Differentiates the Different Human Populations
Establishing what differentiates us from our neighbors, our friends or strangers from distant countries.
Monday, August 05, 2013
Discovered a Future Therapeutic Target for Lung Cancer Treatment
One of the goals of research in cancer genetics and molecular biology is to get an "on demand" treatment, with maximum effect and minimal toxicity.
Monday, July 22, 2013
Brain Epigenome Changes from Birth to Adolescence
Experience of parents with their children and teachers with their students demonstrate how kids change their behaviours and knowledge from childhood to adolescence.
Friday, July 05, 2013
A Gene Conserved from Worms to Humans Opens the Door to new Therapeutics
Gene shows promising therapeutic strategies in cancer and in some types of blindness.
Friday, June 21, 2013
An Epigenetic Change Causes the Block of Antitumor Genes
Healthy cells live in a delicate balance between growth-promoting genes (oncogenes) and those who restrain it (anti-oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes).
Wednesday, June 12, 2013
Identified a Key Protein in Maintaining the Identity of B Lymphocytes
This finding could be useful for the study of blood diseases such as lymphoma and leukemia.
Monday, June 10, 2013
Found in Amish a Genetic Mutation Causing Mental Retardation Very Similar to Angelman Syndrome
It is the first time that associates a mutation in HERC2 with human disease.
Wednesday, March 20, 2013
Epigenetic Mechanism through which Protein SirT2 Regulates Cell Cycle Progression and Genomic Stability
The study of IDIBELL researchers confirms antitumor properties of sirtuin 2.
Wednesday, March 20, 2013
Manel Esteller, ''if the Alphabet is Genetics, Spelling is Epigenetics''
Why don’t identical twins have the same disease at the same time? Why do two cats who share the same DNA have different spots? The answer is in epigenetics.
Friday, November 30, 2012
Scientific News
RNAi Screening Trends
Understand current trends and learn which application areas are expected to gain in popularity over the next few years.
New Tech Enables Epigenomic Analysis with a Mere 100 Cells
A new technology that will dramatically enhance investigations of epigenomes, the machinery that turns on and off genes and a very prominent field of study in diseases such as stem cell differentiation, inflammation and cancer has been developed by researchers at Virginia Tech.
Access Denied: Leukemia Thwarted by Cutting Off Link to Environmental Support
A new study reveals a protein’s critical – and previously unknown -- role in the development and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a fast-growing and extremely difficult-to-treat blood cancer.
New Weapon in the Fight Against Blood Cancer
This strategy, which uses patients’ own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable.
Toxin from Salmonid Fish has Potential to Treat Cancer
Researchers from the University of Freiburg decode molecular mechanism of fish pathogen.
Study Finds Non-Genetic Cancer Mechanism
Cancer can be caused solely by protein imbalances within cells, a study of ovarian cancer has found.
Scientists Create CRISPR/Cas9 Knock-In Mutations in Human T Cells
In a project spearheaded by investigators at UC San Francisco, scientists have devised a new strategy to precisely modify human T cells using the genome-editing system known as CRISPR/Cas9.
Tracking Breast Cancer Before it Grows
A team of scientists led by University of Saskatchewan researcher Saroj Kumar is using cutting-edge Canadian Light Source techniques to screen and treat breast cancer at its earliest changes.
DNA Damage Seen in Patients Undergoing CT Scanning
Along with the burgeoning use of advanced medical imaging tests over the past decade have come rising public health concerns about possible links between low-dose radiation and cancer.
The Mystery of the Instant Noodle Chromosomes
Researchers from the Lomonosov Moscow State University evaluated the benefits of placing the DNA on the principle of spaghetti.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,400+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!