Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Releasing the Untapped Biotech Potential of the Sea

Published: Friday, November 29, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, November 29, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Exploitation of marine microorganisms has been hampered by the difficulty and expense of isolating their valuable novel chemicals and molecules.

While marine microorganisms have long been identified as an untapped resource of biotechnological potential, the vast majority have until now not been properly cultivated. 

This is a wasted opportunity, and is something that the EU-funded Marine Microorganisms: Cultivation Methods for improving their Biotechnological Applications (MaCuMBA) project aims to rectify. Launched in August 2012, this four-year initiative will improve the isolation rate of marine microorganisms by using innovative new methods. 

These methods include the co-cultivation of interdependent microorganisms that mimic the natural environment. Signalling molecules produced by microorganisms will help to stimulate growth of the same or other species. In fact, these signalling molecules represent an interesting and potentially marketable product in themselves. 

The project consortium took opportunity to take stock of the progress made so far during its first General Assembly, held in Rostock, France in September. "The work carried out by the MaCuMBA project will increase the time and effort invested in getting new microbes in pure culture," says Professor Francisco Rodriguez-Valera, leader of MaCuMBA's Work Package 6 on sequencing, genomic and metagenomic libraries and meta genome analyses. 

"This kind of research is restricted by the high risk that it implies, in spite of the high gain that it provides once significant new microbes are obtained as pure cultures, so projects such as MaCuMBA are important." 

Work Package 6 uses genomics and meta-genomics in order to obtain pure cultures of individual marine microbes and to increase our understanding of their biology. "Sequencing nucleic acids is the fastest and highest yield method presently available for acquiring information about microbes," says Professor Rodriguez-Valera. "We will use these technologies to advance our knowledge of the main microbial characters that play a role in the functions of the ocean ecosystem. Learning how to use these organisms will help us to improve the sustainability of both the ocean ecosystem and the European economy through biotechnological processes." 

In sum, the project will increase the success rate in isolating marine microbes and numerous novel marine bacteria, improve cultivation efficiency of biotechnological relevant marine microorganisms and increase the production rate of new biomolecules with high added value. MaCuMBA also aims to develop culturing methods that mimic natural conditions and advance our understanding of how cell-to-cell communication could affect the isolation and cultivation efficiency of marine microorganisms. 

The MaCuMBA project is being led by the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), and is a joint venture of 23 partner institutions from 11 EU countries. All partners share the common aim of uncovering the untold diversity of marine microbes using cultivation-dependent strategies. 

The project is scheduled to run until July 2016.


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Poor Survival Rates in Leukemia Linked to Persistent Genetic Mutations
For patients with an often-deadly form of leukemia, new research suggests that lingering cancer-related mutations – detected after initial treatment with chemotherapy – are associated with an increased risk of relapse and poor survival.
Searching Big Data Faster
Theoretical analysis could expand applications of accelerated searching in biology, other fields.
Growing Hepatitis C in the Lab
Recent discovery allows study of naturally occurring forms of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the lab.
Inciting an Immune Attack on Cancer Cells
A new minimally invasive vaccine that combines cancer cells and immune-enhancing factors could be used clinically to launch a destructive attack on tumors.
Reprogramming Cancer Cells
Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a way to potentially reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy.
Genetic Overlapping in Multiple Autoimmune Diseases May Suggest Common Therapies
CHOP genomics expert leads analysis of genetic architecture, with eye on repurposing existing drugs.
Surprising Mechanism Behind Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Uncovered
Now, scientists at TSRI have discovered that the important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, develops resistance to this drug by “switching on” a previously uncharacterized set of genes.
How DNA ‘Proofreader’ Proteins Pick and Edit Their Reading Material
Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have discovered how two important proofreader proteins know where to look for errors during DNA replication and how they work together to signal the body’s repair mechanism.
Fat in the Family?
Study could lead to therapeutics that boost metabolism.
Tissue Bank Pays Dividends for Brain Cancer Research
Checking what’s in the bank – the Brisbane Breast Bank, that is – has paid dividends for UQ cancer researchers.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!