Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Epigenetics Researchers Enthuse Over Chromatrap ChIP Technology

Published: Thursday, January 02, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, January 02, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Porvair Sciences reports strong growing demand for their Chromatrap® chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay technology from academic groups and biopharmaceutical organisations involved with epigenetic research.

Stephen Knight, Sales and Marketing Director commented "An expanding number of proven application solutions and the introduction of the Chromatrap® 96 HT solid-state ChIP high throughput platform has enabled us to more than double the number of research groups using ChromaTrap assay technology during the last 12 months".  He added "We are particularly pleased by the very positive feedback from early adopters of the technology".

Brian J. Engel, a Biochemistry & Cell Biology researcher at Rice University, USA commented "What I like most about the Chromatrap kit compared to traditional bead-based ChIP assays is the ease of use, speed and reliability. There is no worry about accidentally losing beads during washes and reducing output chromatin when using the column-based method". His colleague - Curt Warren added "We have found that the Chromatrap kit is quick, reliable and flexible.  Saving reagents and time with this kit makes it easier and more feasible to conduct more thorough and effective IP based experiments.  With the enhanced reproducibility using Chromatrap, I would not go back to bead-based ChIP and the assay has been fully endorsed and adopted within our research team".

Professor Steve Conlan, Head of Molecular & Cell Biology at Swansea University, UK commented "Chromatrap streamlines the complicated experimental procedure associated with chromatin-IP making it a much quicker and user-friendly assay compared to conventional bead based assays. Using this kit we obtain much more consistent data, and most importantly can use much less input sample. We have made a permanent switch to using Chromatrap for all our cell line and primary cell based assays, and fully endorse the technology". Research assistant - Dr Helen Whiteland added "What I like about the Chromatrap assay is the ease of use and quick method allowing me to analyse my data in the same day".

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Porvair Filtration Group Receives Queen’s Award for Enterprise in International Trade
This award had been made in recognition of Porvair’s substantial growth in overseas business, achieving increased year-on-year growth in sales of exported products over the past three years.
Tuesday, April 21, 2015
Biomedical Researcher wins Microplate Catalogue Prize Draw
A scientist at the Genomics CoreLab of the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Addenbrooke's Hospital (Cambridge, UK) has won Porvair Sciences' latest free prize draw for people registering online for the company's 2010-2011 Microplate Catalogue.
Wednesday, January 26, 2011
Scientific News
New Tech Vastly Improves CRISPR/Cas9 Accuracy
A new CRISPR/Cas9 technology developed by scientists at UMass Medical School is precise enough to surgically edit DNA at nearly any genomic location, while avoiding potentially harmful off-target changes typically seen in standard CRISPR gene editing techniques.
New Class of RNA Tumor Suppressors Identified
Two short, “housekeeping” RNA molecules block cancer growth by binding to an important cancer-associated protein called KRAS. More than a quarter of all human cancers are missing these RNAs.
Biologists Induce Flatworms to Grow Heads and Brains of Other Species
Findings shed light on role of a new kind of epigenetic signaling in evolution, could yield clues for understanding birth defects and regeneration.
Turning up the Tap on Microbes Leads to Better Protein Patenting
Mining millions of proteins could become faster and easier with a new technique that may also transform the enzyme-catalyst industry, according to University of California, Davis, researchers.
Mathematical Model Forecasts the Path of Breast Cancer
Chances of survival depend on which organs breast cancer tumors colonize first.
Exploring the Causes of Cancer
Queen's research to understand the regulation of a cell surface protein involved in cancer.
Ancient Viral Molecules Essential for Human Development
Genetic material from ancient viral infections is critical to human development, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Tardigrade's Are DNA Master Thieves
Tardigrades, nearly microscopic animals that can survive the harshest of environments, including outer space, hold the record for the animal that has the most foreign DNA.
The Secret Behind the Power of Bacterial Sex
Migration between different communities of bacteria is the key to the type of gene transfer that can lead to the spread of traits such as antibiotic resistance, according to researchers at Oxford University.
Farming’s in Their DNA
Ancient genomes reveal natural selection in action.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos