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AIR™ Genomic DNA Sequencing Kit

Product Description
The AIR™ Genomic DNA Sequencing Kit is ideally suited for genomic DNA preparation of expression libraries for single read next-generation sequencing on Illumina platforms. This kit offers the simplest way to sequence short inserts or selected genomic regions. The AIR™ DNA Sequencing Kits offer significant improvements over traditional library preparation methods, including their ability to produce high quality, unbiased, sequencer-ready libraries from as little as 50 ng of DNA. They are complete kits that include all enzymes, adapters and clean-up columns needed for library preparation, facilitating the user’s ability to move from purified genomic DNA to cluster generation. DNA Fragmentation Both the AIR™ Paired End and the AIR Genomic DNA Sequencing Kits are compatible with the AIR™ DNA Fragmentation Kit that provides a means for unbiased DNA fragmentation. These kits are also compatible with alternative DNA shearing technologies such as ultrasound and sonication. Each kit has been functionally validated with the Illumina GAII and HiSeq 2000 sequencing platforms. These kits are designed for use in de novo sequencing and targeted re-sequencing applications. Sample Multiplexing AIR™ DNA Barcodes can be used to provide flexibility in high-throughput sequencing applications. They significantly increase scale and throughput while reducing costs by allowing the user to pool up to 96 multiple paired end library preparations into a single flow cell. For larger volume requirements, customized and bulk packaging is available. Please contact nextgen@biooscientific.com for further information.
Product AIR™ Genomic DNA Sequencing Kit
Company BIOO Scientific - Product Directory
Price Request a quote
More Information View company product page
Catalog Number 5138-01
Quantity 10 rxns
Company Logo

BIOO Scientific - Product Directory
3913 Todd Lane Suite 312 Austin, TX 78744, USA

Tel: +1 512-707-8993
Fax: +1 512-707-8122
Email: info@biooscientific.com



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