Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Biomolecular Screening
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Gel Boosts Stem Cell Studies

Published: Thursday, January 10, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, January 10, 2013
Bookmark and Share
University scientists have found a new way to manufacture stem cells for research into treating diseases.

Scientists have developed a family of compounds that can support the growth of human embryonic stem cells on a large scale.

Their technique could have applications for use in drug testing or treatments for conditions such as such as Huntington’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

The new materials, which are water-based gels, act as a tiny scaffold to which cells can cling as they grow.

Normally cells must be grown on expensive biological surfaces that can carry risk of contamination.

Once cells have multiplied sufficiently for their intended purpose, the gels can be cooled, enabling the stem cells to drop off the scaffold without becoming damaged.

The new approach surpasses existing techniques of separating cells by mechanical or chemical means, which carry a greater risk of damage to cells.

Scientists say the materials could offer a means of enabling the stem cells to be produced in large numbers efficiently and with a lowered risk of contamination.

This could facilitate research, drug screening programmes and clinical applications that call for large numbers of cells.

Researchers at the University developed the materials by screening hundreds of potential compounds for their ability to support stem cell growth.

From a shortlist of four, one has been found to be effective, and researchers say the remaining three show similar potential.

Stem cells provide a powerful tool for screening drugs as they can be used to show the effects of drugs on cells and systems within the body.

The study, published in Nature Communications, was supported by the European Union Framework 7 Grant Funding.

The gels are being developed under licence by technology company Ilika.

Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 5,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
Influential Cancer Researcher Receives Agilent Thought Leader Award
Biologist Scott Lowe receives award in recognition for his contributions to cancer biology.
Startup Seeks More Precise Prostate Cancer Screening
Gregor Diagnostics aims to bring a non-invasive prostate cancer screening test to the market.
Tumor Markers Reveal Lethality Of Bladder Cancers
Researchers found that detection of certain tumor cells in early stage cancers helps identify high-risk cancers.
Preventing "Friendly Fire" in the Pancreas
Researchers inhibit process that leads to the body attacking its own insulin-producing cells.
Drug Target for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Found
A team of researchers led by UC San Francisco scientists has identified a new drug target for triple-negative breast cancer.
3D-Printed Heart-On-A-Chip with Integrated Sensors
Researchers have created the first 3D-printed organ-on-a-chip with integrated sensors, paving the way for more complex, customizable devices.
Smartphone Laboratory Detects Cancer
Researchers develop low-cost, portable laboratory on a smartphonecapable of analysing multiple samples simultaneously.
First Entirely 3D-printed Organ-on-a-Chip with Integrated Sensors
New approach to manufacturing may allow researchers to rapidly design organs-on-chips that match the properties of a specific disease or individual patient's cells.
Targeting Cannabinoid CB2 Receptors in the CNS
With endogenous cannabinoids considered as a potential target to combat CNS diseases, this article examines the role of CB2R could play in fighting some disorders.
Bacterial Genes Boost Current in Human Cells
Borrowing and tweaking bacterial genes to enhance electrical activity might treat heart, nervous system injury.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,200+ scientific videos