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SCHOTT Assists the Pharmaceutical Industry on Tracking Pharmaceutical Tubing

Published: Thursday, January 23, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, January 23, 2014
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Company issues its 1 millionth certificate for its FIOLAX® glass tubing.

SCHOTT is supporting the pharmaceutical industry in its efforts to track the tubing used to produce pharmaceutical packaging made of glass. The company issued its 1 millionth certificate for its FIOLAX® glass tubing just recently.

These certificates help to identify the products shipped as tubing that are subsequently processed into pharmaceutical packaging, vials or syringes, for example.

They contain more detailed information on the dimensional quality and the quality of the glass. This enables pharmaceutical companies to track their packaging all the way back to the raw material “glass tubing,” if necessary.

Traceability is currently one of the most pressing issues for the pharmaceutical industry. It is closely related to more stringent requirements for quality and safety in manufacturing, shipping and administering medicines. Packaging is thus an integral part of all safety considerations.

SCHOTT became the first company in the industry to allow for all of the pharmaceutical tubing it manufactures to be identified back in 1999. The certificates are applied to the pallet in a clearly visible position and enable customers to inspect incoming shipments more easily because they contain plenty of detailed information.

One part of the certificate can be detached and stored for documentation purposes and used to perform subsequent tracking & tracing inside the e-commerce portal.

SCHOTT’s certificates can be distinguished from the certificates that its competitors use mainly in terms of their great depth of detail and clarity. Besides a description of the product that includes an exact definition of all of the characteristics of importance to the customer, they also contain highly detailed specifications on tolerances.

“In other words, we offer our customers the highest possible transparency and reliable quality,” concludes Jürgen Achatz, Global Sales Director for Pharmaceutical Tubing at SCHOTT.

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