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Biotage Announces the Launch of ISOLUTE® PLD+

Published: Monday, January 27, 2014
Last Updated: Sunday, January 26, 2014
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Improved sensitivity with the new protein and phospholipid removal plate.

Biotage has announced the launch of ISOLUTE® PLD+, a protein and phospholipid removal plate for the clean-up of blood based matrix samples for analysis by LC-MS/MS.

ISOLUTE® PLD+ plates combine protein and phospholipid removal in a single product providing very effective and extremely simple sample clean-up for LC-MS/MS analysis. Utilizing our solvent crash / filter process the plates also incorporate a phospholipid scavenging sorbent layer, which removes phospholipids from the sample during the filtration step.

ISOLUTE® PLD+ plates remove more than 99% of plasma proteins and phospholipids, the main causes of ion suppression, leading to cleaner extracts and increased sensitivity, signal-to-noise, for a broad range of analytes.

Once purified, samples can be analyzed directly, or evaporated and reconstituted in a solvent that matches users analytical method requirements.

ISOLUTE® PLD+ plates can be processed using 96-well compatible positive pressure manifolds (such as the Biotage® Pressure+ 96), vacuum manifolds (for example the Biotage® VacMaster™ 96) and most automated liquid handling systems.

ISOLUTE® PLD+ is available in the standard SBS/ANSI standard 96-well plate format and typical sample volumes of 100 to 200 µL can be processed.

“Requiring next to no method development, ISOLUTE® PLD+ can be integrated quickly and easily into routine workflow, increasing productivity and reducing instrument downtime” said Paul Roberts, Analytical Product Manager, Biotage AB, Sweden.

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