Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Biomolecular Screening
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Leica Microsystems Celebrates 10 Years of Super-Resolution Innovations

Published: Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Last Updated: Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Leica TCS SP8 STED 3X introduction in 2014 marks Company’s 10th anniversary.

The introduction of the Leica TCS SP8 STED 3X in 2014 marks Leica Microsystems’ 10th anniversary of leading innovations in super-resolution technology.

“Leica Microsystems was by far the first company to take the breakthrough of the diffraction limit in light microscopy and implement this in products,” says Professor Stefan W. Hell, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Goettingen, Germany, and the father of super-resolution technology.

The latest generation of Leica Microsystems’ super-resolution systems, Leica TCS SP8 STED 3X and Leica SR GSD 3D, will be presented at the FOM (Focus on Microcopy) from 13 to 16 April in Sydney, Australia.

In 2004, Leica Microsystems revolutionized light microscopy with the introduction of the first commercial super-resolution microscope, Leica TCS 4PI. Super-resolution technology enables researchers to image structures in a range down to the molecular level.

During the last ten years, Leica Microsystems has continuously developed its super-resolution portfolio and today offers both confocal and wide field super-resolution technologies : STED (STimulated Emission Depletion) and GSDIM/dSTORM (Ground State Depletion followed by Individual Molecule return/direct Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy).

Leica Microsystems developed its super-resolution microscopes in close cooperation with Professor Stefan W. Hell, who was awarded Deutscher Zukunftspreis(German Future Prize) in 2006 for the invention of STED nanoscopy. More awards for Leica Microsystems’ innovations - such as Innovationspreis der deutschen Wirtschaft (German Business Award) in 2005 for the Leica TCS 4PI, the R&D 100 Award in 2012 for the Leica SR GSD and the Top 10 Innovations Award in 2013 for the Leica SR GSD 3D - underline the importance of super-resolution microscopy for life sciences.

Leading scientists in the field believe super-resolution will be standard in the near future. “Within a couple of years, the super-resolution method will be the must for all cell biologists”, explains Dr. Yasushi Okada from the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center, in Osaka, Japan, a user of a STED microscope from Leica Microsystems.

With the establishment of the European Super-Resolution User Club, Leica Microsystems annually provides an open and informative platform and room for exchanging experiences for STED and GSD users on all aspects of super-resolution.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Yale University and Leica Microsystems Partner
Yale welcomes scientists to participate in core facility opening and super-resolution workshops October 20 through 31, 2014.
Tuesday, September 30, 2014
Scientific News
Enzyme Malfunction May be Why Binge Drinking Can Lead to Alcoholism
A new study in mice shows that restoring the synthesis of a key brain chemical tied to inhibiting addictive behavior may help prevent alcohol cravings following binge drinking.
Cell's Waste Disposal System Regulates Body Clock Proteins
New way to identify interacting proteins could identify potential drug targets.
Compound Doubles Up On Cancer Detection
Researchers have found that tagging a pair of markers found almost exclusively on a common brain cancer yields a cancer signal that is both more obvious and more specific to cancer.
Promising Drug Candidate to Treat Chronic Itch
In a new study, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) describe a class of compounds with the potential to stop chronic itch without the adverse side effects normally associated with medicating the condition.
Are Changes to Current Colorectal Cancer Screening Guidelines Required?
Editorial suggests more research is needed to pinpoint age to end aggressive screening.
Assessing Cancer Patient Survival and Drug Sensitivity
RNA editing events another way to investigate biomarkers and therapy targets.
New Molecular Marker for Killer Cells
Cell marker enables prognosis about the course of infections.
Potential Target for Treatment of Autism
Grant of $2.4 million will support further research.
Sniffing Out Cancer
Scientists have been exploring new ways to “smell” signs of cancer by analyzing what’s in patients’ breath.
Inroads Against Leukaemia
Potential for halting disease in molecule isolated from sea sponges.

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos