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Innovative technology that enables RNAi in difficult to transfect cells
Christina Yamada, Kathryn Robinson, Allison St. Amand, Zaklina Strezoska, Greg Wardle, Anastasia Khvorova, Devin Leake

Investigations at Dharmacon have led to the development of innovative siRNA molecules that can be delivered into difficult-to-transfect cells without additional lipid reagents, virus, or instruments. This technology, Accell siRNA reagents, enables gene knockdown for functional genomic studies in a wide variety of cell types. In some instances, cells can be continuously dosed with Accell siRNAs to enable target gene knockdown for extended durations.

Innovative technology that enables RNAi in difficult to transfect cells
Christina Yamada, Kathryn Robinson, Allison St. Amand, Zaklina Strezoska, Greg Wardle, Anastasia Khvorova, Devin Leake

Investigations at Dharmacon have led to the development of innovative siRNA molecules that can be delivered into difficult-to-transfect cells without additional lipid reagents, virus, or instruments. This technology, Accell siRNA reagents, enables gene knockdown for functional genomic studies in a wide variety of cell types. In some instances, cells can be continuously dosed with Accell siRNAs to enable target gene knockdown for extended durations.

THe AtSCL26 transcription factor controls cross-talk between GA and N root architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana roots
Beatriz Lagunas, Anthony D. Carter, Dafyd Jenkins and Miriam Gifford

Phenotypic and molecular evidence supports the hypothesis that developmental program enabling nodule formation arose during evolution from a lateral root ‘blueprint’ pre-existing in all higher plants . We reasoned that analyzing Arabidopsis genes orthologous to regulators of nodulation could shed insight on control of lateral root development. This led us to the discovery that an Arabidopsis GRAS family transcription factor controls lateral root development under specific nitrogen conditions.

LOHA Comprehensive Assay for Single Nucleotide Polymorphism, Copy Number Variants and Loss of Heterozygosity Using SureSelect Target Enrichment
Kyeong Soo Jeong, Arjun Vadapalli, Ashutosh Ashutosh, Paula Costa, Brian Peter, Stephanie Fulmer-Smentek, Magnus Isaksson, Jayati Ghosh, Douglas Roberts, Holly Hogrefe

Here we describe a comprehensive assay that enables researchers to identify SNP, INDEL, CNV, and LOH using SureSelect target enrichment. This design can be employed as a standalone entity or in concert with other bait designs for SNP and INDEL detection. We also describe methods for data analysis and visualization.

The Power Decoder simulator for the evaluation of pooled shRNA screen performance
Jesse Stombaugh, Abel Licon, Žaklina Strezoska, Joshua Stahl, Sarah Bael Anderson, Michael Banos, Anja van Brabant Smith, Amanda Birmingham, Annaleen Vermeulen

Power Decoder (written in R and Python) simulates shRNA pooled screening experiments in silico to allow for the estimation of a screen’s statistical power. Populations of shRNAs were engineered in such a way that the magnitude of depletion and enrichment was known, then using the negative binomial distribution, an in silico model was developed to successfully resemble data from an actual laboratory experiment.

Building a Diverse and Experimentally-Curated Fragment Library
Andrew Lowerson, Steven LaPlante, Patrick McCarren, and Michael Serrano-Wu

Presenting a new fragment collection with experimentally-determined aqueous solubility that will address a major source of false positives and attrition in fragment screening

Polymer Microarrays for Biomaterial Development
Simmonte, M.J.1, Dhaliwal, K.2, Cuschieri, K.3, Graham, S.V.4, Bradley, M.1

The application of polymer microarrays in the discovery of biocompatible and bioactive substrates. Progress towards biomaterial development for the treatment of SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome), and improving cervical cytology.

Knockdown of long noncoding RNAs in breast cancer
1 Jennii Luu, 2 Jesper Maag, 1 Yanny Handoko, 3 Richard Redvers, 3,4 Robin L. Anderson, 5 Maren M. Gross , 2 Marcel E. Dinger, and 1,3 Kaylene J. Simpson 1 Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre; 2 Genome Informatics, The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, The Garvan Institute of Medical Research; 3 Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, 4 Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne;

RNAi global collaboration study using Lincode siRNA in a primary screen of tumor and nontumor breast cell lines. Hundreds of lncRNAs are found to affect viability and cell morphology of breast cancer. Presented at Keystone Symposia on Long Noncoding RNAs: From Evolution to Function, Mar 15 - Mar 20, 2015.

DETERMINATION OF THE QUALITY OF ACTIVE INGREDIENTS IN PAIN KILLERS USING GC-MS
Elizabeth N.M Murago1, Nathan Oyaro1, Anthony N. Gachanja, Onditi O. Anam, Felix M. Mawili, Steve Lancaster

From this study, the pain killers sampled were found to have large error bars suggesting that there exist counterfeit drugs in the market. The brands mostly affected for analysis of acetaminophen were panadol, action, P500, P5500, elymol and neladol. The error bars for caffeine analysis were quite low indicating that all tablets either counterfeit or original maintained the same amount of this active ingredient.

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Scientific News
Breast Cancer Drug Hope
A drug for breast cancer that is more effective than existing medicines may be a step closer thanks to new research.
Harnessing Nature’s Vast Array of Venoms for Drug Discovery
Scripps scientists have developed a method for rapidly identifying venoms.
A New Platform for Discovering Antibiotics
Harvard chemists hope to shorten time, difficulty in measuring their effectiveness, potential.
The Need for Speed
Evaluating MALDI-TOF as a high-throughput screening technology for the pharmaceutical industry.
Antarctic Sponge Extract Kills MRSA
New findings may provide opportunity for developing new drugs to fight dangerous bacteria currently highly resistant to treatment.
US-India Collab Finds Molecular Signatures of Severe Malaria
Study may be a significant advancement in understanding the causes of severe malaria.
Novel Way to Prevent Deadly Bacterial Infections
Monash scientists may have found a way to stop deadly bacteria from infecting patients. The discovery could lead to a whole new way of treating antibiotic-resistant “superbugs”
Gene Expression Controls Revealed
Researchers have modelled every atom in a key part of the process for switching on genes, revealing a whole new area for potential drug targets.
An Old-New Weapon Against Emerging Chikungunya Virus
Researchers utilize existing drugs to interfere with host factors required for replication of Chikungunya virus.
Using Gene-editing Technology for Faster, Cheaper Antiviral Drug Development
UCLA scientists are working to develop special screening libraries based on a gene-editing technology called CRISPR.
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