Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Metabolomics & Lipidomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Extended Mass Spec Imaging Services Now Available

Published: Tuesday, April 16, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, April 16, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Mass Spec Imaging Center offers MSI service.

Protea Biosciences has announced the release of an extended mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) service offering from the Mass Spec Imaging Center (MSIC™).

This new service portfolio offers advanced MSI services using Protea’s proprietary LAESI DP-1000 Direct Ionization System as well as MALDI (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization) mass spectrometry for a wide variety of sample types and applications.

“This new portfolio of services offers researchers an opportunity to ‘detect’ where their molecules of interest reside in a biological matrix,” said Alessandro Baldi PhD, Protea’s Vice President and General Manager.

Baldi continued, “This spatial information offers critical insight for researchers working in the fields like metabolomics, biomarker discovery, drug discovery, and histopathology.”

To highlight this extended service portfolio, Protea has announced a Spring Webinar Series, which discusses various applications and technologies for mass spectrometric imaging.

These webinars cover topics ranging from biomarker discovery to drug distribution profiling and in vivo applications using the LAESI technology.

The MSIC also serves as a demonstration and training facility to help researchers learn more about mass spectrometry imaging using the tools and techniques developed at Protea.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,100+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Protea, Agilent Launch Collaboration
Collaboration with Agilent to address Biopharma workflow challenges.
Saturday, December 12, 2015
Scientific News
New Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer
Researchers at Purdue University have shown how controlling cholesterol metabolism in pancreatic cancer cells reduces metastasis.
Plasma Biomarkers for Breast Cancer Diagnosis
Plasma lipidomics profiling identified lipid biomarkers in distinguishing early-stage breast cancer from benign lesions.
How Different People Respond To Aspirin
Study findings could be used to help identify those who would benefit most from aspirin use.
Altered Metabolism of Four Compounds Drives Glioblastoma Growth
Findings suggest new ways to treat the malignancy, slow its progression and reveal its extent more precisely.
A Metabolic Twist that Drives Cancer Survival
A novel metabolic pathway that helps cancer cells thrive in conditions that are lethal to normal cells has been identified.
Liver-On-Chip Tracks Dynamics of Cellular Function
Hebrew University’s liver-on-chip platform is uniquely able to monitor metabolic changes indicating mitochondrial damage occurring at drug concentrations previously regarded as safe.
Living Off the Fat of the Land
Do cancer cells synthesize the parts for new cells or scavenge them from the environment?
Liver Disease, Obesity Linked
Kanazawa University researchers find similarities in the impeded signalling between central insulin activity and glucose production in the liver for both obese mice and mice that have had the vagus nerve removed.
Decoding Ties Between Vascular Disease, Alzheimer’s
NIH consortium uses big data, team science to uncover complex interplay of factors.
Gene Identified that May Worsen Cancer Outcome
Some patients with breast cancer, lung cancer and leukaemia seem to fare poorly after treatment because of the effects of a particular gene, a new study finds.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,100+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,500+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!