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You asked for faster speed, less cross-talk, easy operation and low cost … Shimadzu Listened!

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To increase lab efficiency, researchers are constantly challenged to detect more target analytes with greater sensitivity in hundreds of samples per day. To meet this challenge, Shimadzu has developed the LCMS-8030, which combines the power of triple quadrupole mass spectrometry with unmatched speed to provide the ideal complement to its UHPLC systems.

Speed Beyond Comparison
The LCMS-8030 features ultrafast multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions (dwell times of 1msec and pause times of 1msec), enabling data acquisition with up to 500 different channels per second. The improvements to the electronics provide ultrafast mass spectrum measurement speeds of 15,000 u/sec without sacrificing sensitivity or resolution, allowing full spectrum scans within a series of MRM measurements, and ultra-fast polarity switching (15msec) for the most information without signal deterioration.

Patented UFsweeper® technology accelerates ions out of the collision cell by forming a pseudo-potential surface. The result is high-efficiency collision-induced dissociation (CID) and ultra-fast ion transport, reducing the sensitivity losses and cross talk observed on other systems. In addition, higher radio frequency (RF) power capability minimizes pauses between each transition.

When coupled with Shimadzu’s Nexera UHPLC, the LCMS-8030 can provide reliable and accurate detection of peaks only one-second wide, maximizing UHPLC performance. With a polarity switching time of just 15 msec, ultra-fast triple quadrupole measurement time is now a reality.

Integrated Approach to Ultrafast Mass Spectrometry
The combination of the LCMS-8030 with Nexera also brings together the latest hardware on the same platform. The unified platform provides unmatched qualitative and quantitative analysis, increased productivity, and accelerated workflows for high-throughput analysis. Automated optimization of analytical conditions for each quantitative target compound, which is the key to high-sensitivity analysis, allows unattended, overnight operation. In addition, all software operations are handled seamlessly, reducing PC conflicts and the need for user intervention.

Easy Maintenance
With the LCMS-8030, maintenance has never been easier or more accessible. Its robust design allows maximum uptime, resulting in a system that can handle most complex matrices. Maintenance of the desolvation line without breaking vacuum minimizes instrument downtime.

Product You asked for faster speed, less cross-talk, easy operation and low cost … Shimadzu Listened!
Company Shimadzu
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Shimadzu
Shimadzu Scientific Instruments 7102 Riverwood Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 USA

Tel: +1 410-381-1227
Fax: +1 410-381-1222
Email: kgmclaughlin@shimadzu.com



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