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SYNAPT G2-S MS
Waters Corporation

To access the highest levels of information content from your most analytically challenging samples, or utilize analytical tools to make scientific discoveries not possible by any other means, look no further than SYNAPT® G2-S MS. SYNAPT G2-S MS combines revolutionary high performance StepWave™ ion optics, Quantitative Tof (QuanTof™) and Triwave® technologies with unique systems design and support, as well as a unique upgrade path to High Definition MS™ capability:

‘All in’ performance — Achieve the most comprehensive and confident untargeted identification and quantification of compounds with UPLC®/MS/MS, at the lowest levels in complex samples

Upgrade to HDMS™ and access new discoveries — Every scientist can recover unparalleled information content and make new discoveries not possible any other way, by leveraging high-efficiency ion mobility separations with high resolution exact mass tandem MS

Maximum versatility — Serve the broadest range of applications with the most extensive range of targeted data acquisition, chromatographic inlet and ion source capabilities

Instant efficiency — Realize maximum system usability and efficiency across your organisation through Waters design philosophy of Engineered Simplicity™

Accelerated success — Maximize your success with complete application system solutions backed by a superior applications and technical support network

For over 50 years, Waters Corporation has created business advantages for laboratory-dependent organizations. By delivering practical and sustainable scientific innovation, Waters enables significant advancements in such areas as healthcare delivery, environmental management, food safety, and water quality worldwide. For more information, visit www.waters.com.

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