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RSC Holds 5th Conference on High Throughput Medicinal Chemistry

Published: Monday, May 04, 2009
Last Updated: Monday, May 04, 2009
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The conference will explore technology-enabled drug discovery and new synthetic technologies, focusing medicinal chemistry on 12th May 2009 in Cheshire, UK.

The Royal Society of Chemistry’s (RSC) 5th High Throughput Medicinal Chemistry Conference takes place on 12th May 2009 at Alderley Park in Cheshire, UK.

The event will explore technology-enabled drug discovery as well as new synthetic technologies, with a particular focus on medicinal chemistry. As such, this conference will benefit a wide range of organic and medicinal chemists.

Since its conception, the RSC’s High Throughput Chemistry and New Technologies subject group has sought to highlight significant advances in the field, from the pharmaceutical, industrial and academic points of view.

Its 5th conference will focus specifically on: CH activation, Pd coupling, flow chemistry, fragment-based drug discovery and drug discovery in academia. This conference features line-up of speakers, including Greg Fu, MIT; Steven Woodhead, Astex Therapeutics; Rob Maleczka, Michigan State University; Paul Watts, University of Hull; and John G Cumming, Astra Zeneca.

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