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Researcher at UPC’s Terrassa Campus Discovers Genetic Circuit that Regulates Behavior of Stem Cells

Published: Thursday, August 27, 2009
Last Updated: Thursday, August 27, 2009
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The circuit explains the fact that stem cells are always prepared to change into any type of cell.

Jordi Garcia Ojalvo - a lecturer at the Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering of the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya’s School of Industrial and Aeronautical Engineering of Terrassa (ETSEIAT) - has discovered the genetic circuit that controls the behavior of embryonic stem cells.

The discovery was made in collaboration with University of Cambridge researchers. The process by which a stem cell is transformed into another type of cell is called differentiation, and the ability to change into other cell types is known as pluripotentiality.

Up until now it was generally believed in the international scientific community that embryonic stem cells are in a state of biochemical repose, static, awaiting a signal that causes them to differentiate, that gives them the initial trait which leads them to become bone, blood or skin cells, or any other type of cell of which an organism is composed.

Jordi Garcia Ojalvo, one of the coordinators of the Nonlinear Dynamics, Nonlinear Optics and Lasers research group at the UPC’s Terrassa Campus, has discovered that this view is not correct, and that in fact the state of pluripotentiality in stem cells is anything but static.

In a paper published this July in the prestigious journal PLoS Biology, Jordi Garcia Ojalvo and the group headed by University of Cambridge researcher Alfonso Martinez Arias say that the pluripotentiality of embryonic stem cells is not static and that these cells are in fact constantly changing.

Garcia-Ojalvo and Martinez-Arias also found that there is always a subset of stem cells that are on alert, ready to respond to the signals that trigger the process of transformation known as differentiation. This ensures that an embryo’s differentiation program is completed correctly and with the necessary speed.

The study-carried out using mouse embryonic stem cells but with results that are also valid for human stem cells-allowed the researchers to identify the genetic circuit that gives stem cells their pluripotent properties. Thanks to this discovery, it will now be possible to more effectively maintain embryonic stem cells in a pluripotent state in vitro and to more efficiently obtain differentiated cells-blood, bone, skin and other cells-from stem cells.

For the UPC Terrassa and Cambridge researchers, the starting point on the road to their discovery was the hypothesis that chance plays an important role in the process. This is consistent with the fact that disorder plays a fundamental role in the functioning of living organisms. Cells are continually subject to random fluctuations. Based on this premise, Garcia-Ojalvo developed a mathematical model of the functioning of the proposed genetic circuit in the presence of disorder. Martinez-Arias then conducted experimental procedures to confirm these calculations in the lab.


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