Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Drug for Multiple Myeloma Demonstrated to Extend Disease-Free Survival

Published: Thursday, December 24, 2009
Last Updated: Thursday, December 24, 2009
Bookmark and Share
Patients receiving lenalidomide following a blood stem cell transplant had their cancer kept in check longer than placebo receiving patients.

Initial results from a large, randomized clinical trial for patients with multiple myeloma, a cancer of the blood and bone marrow, showed that patients who received the oral drug lenalidomide (Revlimid, also known as CC-5013) following a blood stem cell transplant had their cancer kept in check longer than patients who received a placebo.

The clinical trial, for patients ages 18 to 70, was sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and conducted by a network of researchers led by the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) in collaboration with the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN). The BMT CTN is co-sponsored by NCI and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, both parts of the National Institutes of Health.

The independent data and safety monitoring committee overseeing the trial (known as CALGB-100104) found that the study demonstrated a longer time before the cancer progressed following autologous blood stem cell transplantation for those patients on the study drug than those on placebo and so the trial was stopped early.

Autologous blood stem cell transplantation is a procedure in which a patient's own blood stem cells are removed, the patient is then treated with high doses of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to kill the cancer, after which the blood stem cells are returned to the patient. It is a common procedure for patients with multiple myeloma.

A total of 568 patients with multiple myeloma, who had received no more than 12 months of prior therapy and no prior transplant, were enrolled between December 2004 and July 2009. All patients received autologous transplantation following a high dose of a drug called melphalan, which is commonly used to treat multiple myeloma.

Ultimately, 460 patients who had adequate organ function and no evidence of progressive disease, were randomized between 90 and 100 days after transplant to receive lenalidomide or placebo. Patients began lenalidomide or placebo between day 100 to 110 and continued until they had evidence of progressive disease.

Among the patients who received placebo, half had their myeloma progress (worsen) within an estimated 778 days.  In contrast, for those patients taking lenalidomide, a median time to progression cannot be defined because fewer than half the patients had worsening of their myeloma. This represents a 58 percent reduction in the risk of disease progression for the group taking lenalidomide. This difference in time to progression was highly statistically significant.

This is the first randomized phase 3 trial (the final and most comprehensive aspect of a three-phase clinical trials process) to demonstrate a clinical benefit of lenalidomide following transplant for multiple myeloma. However, the trial has not yet shown evidence of an overall survival benefit.

The types of side effects observed in this trial were similar to those observed in other clinical trials with lenalidomide. Detailed results from this trial will be presented at a future scientific meeting, NCI informs.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 4,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 5,300+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Immune-Cell Traps May Aid Cancer Metastasis
Study suggests cancer cells can induce neutrophils to release traps which the cells use to capture pathogens.
Wednesday, December 07, 2016
Using Cancer Cells' Mass to Predict Treatment Response
A device has been developed that can detect changes in cell mass at a minute scale.
Thursday, November 24, 2016
NCI Collaborates with Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
NCI collaborates with MMRF to incorporate genomic and clinical data into NCI Genomic Data Commons database.
Thursday, September 29, 2016
CES Score May Predict Response to Cancer Treatment
Researchers identify new type of biomarker that helps predict prognosis and response to several types of cancer treatment.
Tuesday, September 27, 2016
Forging Collaborations to Progress Against Cancer
NCI take steps to further international collaborations to expand cancer research.
Monday, September 26, 2016
Stem Cell Transplant Without Radiation or Chemotherapy
Researchers have successfully performed stem cell transplants without using radiation or chemotherapy.
Friday, September 09, 2016
NCI Embraces Recommendations for Cancer Moonshot
NCI accepts recommendations for approaches likely to make progress against cancer under the Cancer Moonshot
Thursday, September 08, 2016
Engineered Stem Cells Identify Medulloblastoma Treatment
Researchers have engineered neural stem cells to carry mutations thought to drive a particular subtype of medulloblastoma.
Monday, September 05, 2016
Tumor DNA in Blood Signals Immunotherapy Response
Research suggests that tumor DNA circulating in blood may be a biological marker for T-cell transfer immunotherapy.
Friday, September 02, 2016
Mutations in DNA-Repair Genes Found in Advanced Prostate Cancers
New findings indicate that nearly 12% of male advanced prostate cancer sufferers have inherited mutation in DNA-repair genes.
Wednesday, July 27, 2016
Identifying Cancer Drug Targets Using 3D-Modelling
Researchers are now able to model genetic mutations manipulation of proteins that can potentially drive cancer.
Monday, July 18, 2016
Elevated Bladder Cancer Risk in New England and Arsenic in Drinking Water From Private Wells
Researchers have found that drinking water from private wells, may have contributed to the elevated risk of bladder cancer in northern new England.
Tuesday, May 03, 2016
Near-Atomic Resolution of Protein Structure Holds Promise for Drug Discovery
A new study shows that it is possible to use an imaging technique called cryo-electron microscopy to view the architecture of a metabolic enzyme bound to a drug that blocks its activity.
Friday, May 08, 2015
National Cancer Institute Awards Two Lung Cancer CTC Development Contracts to Cynvenio Biosystems, Inc.
Company also announces additional equity investment of $2.0 million.
Tuesday, February 07, 2012
2011 Biospecimen Research Network (BRN) Symposium
The National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Biospecimen Research Network Symposium, "Advancing Cancer Research Through Biospecimen Science," will be held March 28-29, 2011, at the Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center in Bethesda, MD
Friday, January 07, 2011
Scientific News
Big Genetics in BC: The American Society for Human Genetics 2016 Meeting
Themes at this year's meeting ranged from the verification, validation, and sharing of data, to the translation of laboratory findings into actionable clinical results.
Stem Cells in Drug Discovery
Potential Source of Unlimited Human Test Cells, but Roadblocks Remain.
Automated Low Volume Dispensing Trends
Gain a better understanding of the current and future market requirements for fully automated LVD systems.
Personality Traits, Psychiatric Disorders Linked to Specific Genomic Locations
Researchers have unearthed genetic correlations between personality traits and psychiatric disorders.
Forensic 3D Documentation of Skin Injuries
In this study, the validity of using photogrammetry for documenting injuries in a pathological context was demonstrated.
3-D Printed Dog’s Nose Improves Vapor Detection
By mimicking how dogs get their whiffs, a team of government and university researchers have demonstrated that “active sniffing” can improve by more than 10 times the performance of current technologies that rely on continuous suction to detect trace amounts of explosives and other contraband.
New Markers for Forensic Body-fluid Identification
University of Bonn researchers have successfully identified specific Micro-RNA signatures to help forensically identify body fluids.
Genetics Control Regenerative Properties Of Stem Cells
Researchers define how genetic factors control regenerative properties of blood-forming stem cells.
Major Neuroscience Initiative Launched
Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute invest $115 million to further expand neuroscience research, while Caltech construct $200 million biosciences complex.
Making It Personal
Cancer vaccine linked to increased immune response against leukemia cells.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
4,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,300+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!