Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

American Chemical Society Unveils International Year of Chemistry Calendar Contest

Published: Monday, January 24, 2011
Last Updated: Monday, January 24, 2011
Bookmark and Share
The American Chemical Society (ACS) is offering students, teachers and others the chance to win cash cards and an iPad, iPod Touch and iPod Nano in a contest to fill in empty dates in its popular IYC-365 online calendar.

Called the “365: Chemistry for Life Contest,” it is part of ACS’ celebration of the International Year of Chemistry. ACS purposely left some days without content, as an invitation to the public to help fill in the gaps, and participate in the IYC. Entries should consist of the name of a chemistry-related person, place, innovation or everyday item with a 300-400 word description of the entry. The description should be written in non-technical language and include a discussion of how the entry improves and impacts everyday life.

Entries accepted for use in the calendar will be eligible for a monthly drawing for a $50 Visa card, and a December drawing for the iPad, iPod Touch, and iPod Nano. Entries will be accepted until midnight on Dec. 1. There is a limit of three entries per person.

ACS on Jan. 1 launched a global, year-long observance of the IYC with a calendar that serves as a virtual time machine, transporting the public back to some of the epic events and great intellects that shaped modern society through the magic of chemistry.

IYC-365 links almost 250 days of the year to events triumphal and trivial in chemistry, health, medicine, energy, the environment and related fields. They range from Jan. 1 — which in 1907 saw the debut of the database that has fostered unprecedented scientific discovery — to Dec. 31 and a scientific law about those New Year’s toasts with champagne.

The 63rd General Assembly of the United Nations proclaimed 2011 as envisioning a worldwide celebration of the achievements of chemistry and its contributions to the well-being of humankind. Also being celebrated in 2011 is the centennial of the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Marie Curie for her work on radioactivity, and the 100th anniversary of the founding of the International Association of Chemical Societies.

The American Chemical Society is a non-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 163,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Sniffing Out Cancer
Scientists have been exploring new ways to “smell” signs of cancer by analyzing what’s in patients’ breath.
Thursday, October 01, 2015
New, Improved Approach To Mammograms
Detecting breast cancer in women with dense mammary tissues could become more reliable with a new mammogram procedure that researchers have now tested in pre-clinical studies of mice.
Friday, September 18, 2015
“Heat” From Chilli Peppers Could Help Kill Cancer Cells
Capsaicin, the compound responsible for chilis’ heat, is used in creams sold to relieve pain, and recent research shows that in high doses, it kills prostate cancer cells.
Friday, September 11, 2015
Preventing Drinking Water Contamination by Pharmaceuticals
In recent years, researchers have realized that many products, including pharmaceuticals, have ended up where they’re not supposed to be — in our drinking water.
Friday, September 11, 2015
Cheap Diagnostics with a Portable "Paper Machine"
Scientists have developed a cheap, portable system for point of care diagnostics for a range of infectious diseases, genetic conditions and cancer.
Monday, July 20, 2015
Microfluidic Device Mixes And Matches DNA For Synthetic Biology
Researchers have developed a microfluidic device that quickly builds packages of DNA and delivers them into bacteria or yeast for further testing.
Monday, July 06, 2015
Artificial Pancreas Controls Diabetes
Scientists are reporting the development of an implantable “artificial pancreas” that continuously measures a person’s blood sugar, or glucose, level and can automatically release insulin as needed.
Friday, July 03, 2015
Expanding the Code of Life With New “Letters”
Researchers have developed a new nucleotide pair that can be added to DNA, raising the possibility that entirely new proteins could be created for medical uses.
Friday, May 29, 2015
Bioresorbable Electronic Stent Could Provide Feedback, Therapy
Researchers have developed and tested a drug releasing electronic stent which could significantly reduce the risk associated with traditional mesh tube stents.
Thursday, May 28, 2015
How Used Coffee-Grounds Could Make Some Food More Healthful
Phenols in coffee ground extracts could be used as additives to enhances other food products.
Thursday, May 14, 2015
Kimchi-based Preservative Used in Cosmetics is Not So Natural
Scientists report that kimchi-based preservative marketed as “all-natural” contains synthetic ingredients.
Friday, April 17, 2015
Novel Nanoparticles Could Save Soldiers’ Lives After Explosions
Researchers paired clot-promoting nanoparticles with a corticosteroid that stops inflammation.
Friday, April 17, 2015
A Novel Method for Portable Detection of Potent Drugs Known as ‘Bath Salts’
Researchers developed a low-cost, disposable and rapid platform for detecting bath salts.
Saturday, September 27, 2014
Stinky Gases Emanating from Landfills Could Transform into Clean Energy
Research will be presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.
Wednesday, August 13, 2014
Carbon Dioxide ‘Sponge’ Could Ease Transition to Cleaner Energy
A sponge-like plastic that sops up the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) might ease our transition away from polluting fossil fuels and toward new energy sources, such as hydrogen.
Wednesday, August 13, 2014
Scientific News
Researchers Develop Classification Model for Cancers Caused by KRAS
Most frequently mutated cancer gene help oncologists choose more effective cancer therapies.
Fixing Holes in the Heart Without Invasive Surgery
UV-light enabled catheter is a medical device which represents a major shift in how cardiac defects are repaired.
Chromosomal Chaos
Penn study forms basis for future precision medicine approaches for Sezary syndrome
Enzyme Malfunction May be Why Binge Drinking Can Lead to Alcoholism
A new study in mice shows that restoring the synthesis of a key brain chemical tied to inhibiting addictive behavior may help prevent alcohol cravings following binge drinking.
Key to Natural Detoxifier’s Reactivity Discovered
Results have implications for health, drug design and chemical synthesis.
New Treatment for Obesity Developed
Researchers at the University of Liverpool, working with a global healthcare company, have helped develop a new treatment for obesity.
New Protein Found in Immune Cells
Immunobiologists from the University of Freiburg discover Kidins220/ARMS in B cells and demonstrate its functions.
Will Brain Palpation Soon Be Possible?
Researchers have developed non-invasive brain imaging technique which provides the same information as physical palpation.
Shaking Up the Foundations of Epigenetics
Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and the University of Barcelona (UB) published a study that challenges some of the current beliefs about epigenetics.
Groundbreaking Computer Program Diagnoses Cancer in Two Days
Researchers have combined genetics with computer science and created a new diagnostic technology can with 85 per cent certainty identify the source of the disease and thus target treatment and, ultimately, improve the prognosis for the patient.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos