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American Chemical Society Unveils International Year of Chemistry Calendar Contest

Published: Monday, January 24, 2011
Last Updated: Monday, January 24, 2011
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The American Chemical Society (ACS) is offering students, teachers and others the chance to win cash cards and an iPad, iPod Touch and iPod Nano in a contest to fill in empty dates in its popular IYC-365 online calendar.

Called the “365: Chemistry for Life Contest,” it is part of ACS’ celebration of the International Year of Chemistry. ACS purposely left some days without content, as an invitation to the public to help fill in the gaps, and participate in the IYC. Entries should consist of the name of a chemistry-related person, place, innovation or everyday item with a 300-400 word description of the entry. The description should be written in non-technical language and include a discussion of how the entry improves and impacts everyday life.

Entries accepted for use in the calendar will be eligible for a monthly drawing for a $50 Visa card, and a December drawing for the iPad, iPod Touch, and iPod Nano. Entries will be accepted until midnight on Dec. 1. There is a limit of three entries per person.

ACS on Jan. 1 launched a global, year-long observance of the IYC with a calendar that serves as a virtual time machine, transporting the public back to some of the epic events and great intellects that shaped modern society through the magic of chemistry.

IYC-365 links almost 250 days of the year to events triumphal and trivial in chemistry, health, medicine, energy, the environment and related fields. They range from Jan. 1 — which in 1907 saw the debut of the database that has fostered unprecedented scientific discovery — to Dec. 31 and a scientific law about those New Year’s toasts with champagne.

The 63rd General Assembly of the United Nations proclaimed 2011 as envisioning a worldwide celebration of the achievements of chemistry and its contributions to the well-being of humankind. Also being celebrated in 2011 is the centennial of the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Marie Curie for her work on radioactivity, and the 100th anniversary of the founding of the International Association of Chemical Societies.

The American Chemical Society is a non-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 163,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.


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