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Assembling Isoniazid

Published: Monday, May 23, 2011
Last Updated: Monday, May 23, 2011
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This paper, published in the journal CrystEngComm, describes how researchers have modified the hydrogen bonding in isonicotinic acid hydrazide (isoniazid) in order to control the self-assembly process.

isoniazid.gif

How does one control and modify the self-assembly process of organic molecules towards a desired solid state? Andreas Lemmerer, Joel Bernstein and Volker Kahlenberg ask themselves this very question in their recent CrystEngComm Hot Article.

Isoniazid is an active pharmaceutical ingredient that helped cure tuberculosis as part of a triple therapy cocktail. It co-crystallizes with carboxylic acids to form pharmaceutical co-crystals and is also a versatile supramolecular reagent as it has multiple donor and accepting groups to interact with different functional groups. Find out more about this study and Isoniazid in the article – FREE to read until 31 May 2011.

Reproduced by permission from The Royal Society of Chemistry from CrystEngComm Blog at http://blogs.rsc.org/ce/





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