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Nanorods Make a Stand

Published: Monday, June 13, 2011
Last Updated: Monday, June 13, 2011
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Utilizing an interesting seed-mediated approach ZnO nanorods were helped to “stand” vertically on microsubstrates.

An article published in CrystEngComm details how, taking ZnO nanosheets as the microsubstrates, ZnO nanorods can grow vertically, not lying horizontally, on the facets with the aid of a seed layer precoating to form hierarchical ZnO nanorod-nanosheet architectures. The diameter as well as the length of the standing nanorods can be controlled effectively by adjusting the growth time and the amount of ammonia in the growth solution. The precoated seed layer has been found to be the key factor in determining the resultant morphology.

Reproduced by permission from The Royal Society of Chemistry from CrystEngComm Blog at http://blogs.rsc.org/ce/


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