Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Smooth Muscle Cells Created from Patients’ Skin Cells

Published: Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Last Updated: Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Bookmark and Share
By using hPSCs scientists discover a method for creating high purity vascular smooth muscle.

Cambridge scientists have for the first time created different types of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) - the cells which make up the walls of blood vessels - using cells from patients’ skin.

Their research, which was partly funded by the Wellcome Trust, is published in the journal Nature Biotechnology.

In the UK, one in three of all deaths is due to cardiovascular disease. The vast majority of these are caused by atherosclerosis, a ‘furring up’ and blockage of blood vessels.

For patients who are unsuitable for conventional stenting or bypass treatment, one option in the future may be to grow new blood vessels to bypass their own blocked vessels.

Lead author of the research, Dr Sanjay Sinha, Wellcome Trust Intermediate Clinical Fellow at the University of Cambridge said: “This research represents an important step in being able to generate the right kind of smooth muscle cells to help construct these new blood vessels. Other patients who may benefit from new blood vessels include those with renal failure, who need vascular grafts for dialysis.”

For the research, the scientists used embryonic stem cells (or similar cells derived from a patient’s skin sample), which have the potential to form any cell type in the body, known as human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs).

Using hPSCs, they discovered a method for creating high purity vascular smooth muscle. Although blood and cardiac cells from hPSCs have been created before, this is the first time that all the major types of vascular smooth muscle cells have been developed and done so in a system which would be easy to scale up for clinical-grade production.

Vascular smooth muscle cells originate from different tissues in the early embryo, and the scientists were able to reproduce three distinct types of embryonic tissue in the culture dish.

Interestingly, these SMCs responded differently to vascular disease causing substances, such as growth factors, depending on which embryonic pathway they had come from.

They conclude that differences in embryonic origin may play a part in determining where and when common vascular diseases such as aortic aneurysms or atherosclerosis develop.

Dr Sinha added: “Using this system, we can begin to understand how SMC origin affects development of vascular disease and why some parts of the vasculature are protected from disease.

“Additionally, there are many patients who have a genetic disorder, such as Marfans Syndrome, that affects their vascular smooth muscle cells and leads to premature death and disability. With this research, and using hPSCs generated from patient skin samples, we will be able to generate smooth muscle cells with the genetic abnormality in a culture dish. This type of ‘disease in a dish’ modelling will allow us to understand the disease better and will allow us to screen for new treatments.”

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Ancient Genome from Africa Sequenced for the First Time
DNA from 4,500-year-old Ethiopian skull reveals a huge migratory wave of West Eurasians into the Horn of Africa around 3,000 years ago had a genetic impact on modern populations right across the African continent.
Monday, October 19, 2015
Greater Understanding Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
A new genetic study of over 200,000 women reveals the underlying mechanisms of polycystic ovary syndrome, as well as potential interventions.
Wednesday, September 30, 2015
Maintaining Healthy DNA Delays Menopause
An international study of nearly 70,000 women has identified more than forty regions of the human genome that are involved in governing at what age a woman goes through menopause.
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
New Consortium to Develop and Study Early Stage Drugs
An innovative new Consortium will act as a ‘match-making’ service between pharmaceutical companies and researchers in Cambridge with the aim of developing and studying precision medicines for some of the most globally devastating diseases.
Thursday, July 30, 2015
MRSA Contamination Found in Supermarket Pork
A survey carried out earlier this year has found the first evidence of the ‘superbug’ bacteria Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in sausages and minced pork obtained from supermarkets in the UK.
Monday, June 22, 2015
Expression of Certain Genes Changes with the Seasons
As the seasons change, so do the expression levels of many human genes, including ones involved in immune function, according to new research.
Thursday, May 14, 2015
Blood Markers Could Help Predict Outcome Of Infant Heart Surgery
New research suggests it may be possible to predict an infant’s progress following surgery for congenital heart disease by analysing a number of important small molecules in the blood.
Friday, May 08, 2015
Poisons, Plants and Palaeolithic Hunters
Dr Valentina Borgia to develop a technique for detecting residues of deadly substances on archaeological objects.
Saturday, April 11, 2015
‘Mini-Lungs’ Grown To Aid The Study Of Cystic Fibrosis
'Mini-lungs’ have been created using stem cells derived from skin cells of patients with cystic fibrosis.
Thursday, March 19, 2015
Gene Discovery Provides Clues To How TB May Evade The Immune System
The largest genetic study of TB susceptibility to date has led to a potentially important new insight into how the pathogen manages to evade the immune system.
Tuesday, March 17, 2015
Human Genome Includes 'Foreign' Genes Not From Our Ancestors
Many animals, including humans, acquired essential ‘foreign’ genes from microorganisms co-habiting their environment in ancient times, according to research published in the open access journal Genome Biology.
Monday, March 16, 2015
Order Matters: Sequence Of Genetic Mutations Determines How Cancer Behaves
The order in which genetic mutations are acquired determines how an individual cancer behaves, according to research from the University of Cambridge, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Thursday, February 12, 2015
Artificially-intelligent Robot Scientist ‘Eve’ Could Boost Search for New Drugs
Eve, an artificially-intelligent ‘robot scientist’ could make drug discovery faster and much cheaper, say researchers writing in the Royal Society journal Interface.
Wednesday, February 04, 2015
Using Genome Sequencing to Track MRSA in Under-resourced Hospitals
Whole genome sequencing of MRSA from a hospital in Asia has demonstrated patterns of transmission in a resource-limited setting, where formal screening procedures are not feasible.
Thursday, December 11, 2014
Amazing Feet Of Science: Researchers Sequence The Centipede Genome
What it lacks in genes, it certainly makes up for in legs: the genome of the humble centipede has been found to have around 15,000 genes – around 7,000 fewer than a human.
Wednesday, November 26, 2014
Scientific News
High Throughput Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening Assay Trends
Dr John Comley provides an insight into HT MS-based screening with a focus on future user requirements and preferences.
How a Genetic Locus Protects Adult Blood-Forming Stem Cells
Mammalian imprinted Gtl2 protects adult hematopoietic stem cells by restricting metabolic activity in the cells' mitochondria.
Genetic Basis of Fatal Flu Side Effect Discovered
A group of people with fatal H1N1 flu died after their viral infections triggered a deadly hyperinflammatory disorder in susceptible individuals with gene mutations linked to the overactive immune response, according to a recent study.
New Tech Vastly Improves CRISPR/Cas9 Accuracy
A new CRISPR/Cas9 technology developed by scientists at UMass Medical School is precise enough to surgically edit DNA at nearly any genomic location, while avoiding potentially harmful off-target changes typically seen in standard CRISPR gene editing techniques.
The MaxSignal Colistin ELISA Test Kit from Bioo Scientific
Kit can help prevent the antibiotic apocalypse by keeping last resort drugs out of the food supply.
"Good" Mozzie Virus Might Hold Key to Fighting Human Disease
Australian scientists have discovered a new virus carried by one of the country’s most common pest mosquitoes.
Non-Disease Proteins Kill Brain Cells
Scientists at the forefront of cutting-edge research into neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s have shown that the mere presence of protein aggregates may be as important as their form and identity in inducing cell death in brain tissue.
Closing the Loop on an HIV Escape Mechanism
Research team finds that protein motions regulate virus infectivity.
New Class of RNA Tumor Suppressors Identified
Two short, “housekeeping” RNA molecules block cancer growth by binding to an important cancer-associated protein called KRAS. More than a quarter of all human cancers are missing these RNAs.
Potential Treatment for Life-Threatening Viral Infections Revealed
The findings point to new therapies for Dengue, West Nile and Ebola.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos